OPEN LETTER TO THE COMMON COUNCIL ON THE FASNY DENOUMENT

WPCNR THE LETTER TICKER. From the Gedney Association. April 23,2017:

 

April 14, 2017The Common Council
City of White Plains
255 Main Street
White Plains, New York 10601Dear Members of the Common Council:The latest events concerning FASNY’s unrelenting efforts to build a regional school complex in the south end of the City raise very serious legal questions.  Let’s review the facts:

  • In 2013 the Common Council found the entire former Ridgeway Country Club as an environmentally sensitive site. In fact, the City went out of its way to say that each of the parcels were environmentally sensitive;
  • In September of 2016 The Common Council in a split 4 to 3 vote agreed to a Stipulation of Agreement to review yet another FASNY plan in which the school development would be on Parcel A and as part of that review consider removing that parcel as an environmentally sensitive site.  The Agreement said the Common Council would “determine whether the Alternative Plan is or involves any ‘Environmentally Sensitive Site or Feature’ as defined in Section 2.4 of the City Zoning Ordinance”.
  • In the Fall of 2016 the Gedney Association engaged an environmental specialist who submitted a report on November 30, 2016 confirming that the Parcel was an “Environmentally Sensitive Site” under the City’ regulations.
  • Over three months passed when on March 10, 2017 FASNY’s attorney sent a letter to the Mayor and Common Council complaining about the Gedney Association’s report and unbelievably said Such a determination would undermine one of the essential premises of the Stipulation of Agreement that FASNY’s limitation on its reduced Alternative School Plan to Parcel A would require only a majority vote”.  There is absolutely nothing in the Stipulation that even remotely suggests this.  The letter suggests some sort of “private deal” hatched by the parties secretly which we all know is not legal and requires further investigation regardless of the outcome of the Common Council decision.
  • Three days later on March 10, 2017 Commissioner of Planning Gomez sent a memorandum to the Common Council confirming that Parcel A was indeed an Environmentally Sensitive Site.
  • On March 15, 2017 the Common Council voted that Parcel A was indeed an Environmentally Sensitive Site.  On the night of the Meeting the Roach administration released two reports prepared for the City confirming the site’s Environmentally Sensitive Site designation.  These reports were dated November 28, 2016 and February 16, 2017 but not released until that night. These reports should have made public months ago.
  •  Lastly, FASNY’s lawyer keeps referring to Scenic Hudson’s two page letter supporting FASNY’s argument that the stream in question is a ditch.  I personally spoke to a signer of the Scenic Hudson letter who said they never inspected the site which is an essential requirement of any such analysis.  I should also note that the Chair of the French American School Andrea Soros Columbel is on the Advisory Board of Scenic Hudson.  Another surprise.

The other significant and frankly bizarre modification in the new plan is the proposed use of Ridgeway.  In December of 2013 the Common Council in its Environmental Findings resolution was emphatic in stating:

  • “The potential significant adverse impacts on public infrastructure of the MPP/Ridgeway as proposed cannot be mitigated” (Finding H-13)
  • “None of the Ridgeway access mitigation measures address the unmitigated significant adverse impact that full access to the project Site from Ridgeway and Hathaway Lane has on the role of Ridgeway as a Collector Street, not as an arterial roadway, as identified in the City’s Comprehensive Plan”. ( Finding J-8)
  • In a report dated November 2012 Sue Habel former City Planning Commissioner cited the following adverse impacts in using Ridgeway:
    • Impacts on the operation of Ridgeway as a Collector road;
    • Impacts to traffic flow into and out of the downtown on both North Street and Mamaroneck Avenue due to signal timing and adjustments;
    • Impacts to pedestrians using Ridgeway which does not have sidewalks along its length from the Proposed Project to North Street.
    • Impacts on local neighborhood streets due to cut-through traffic to avoid congestion on the major arterial streets and particularly on Ridgeway during AM and PM drop-off and pick-up periods.

The latest FASNY plan actually increases the student population for the middle and high school from 478 in May of 2014 to now 640.  Our traffic engineer points out that FASNY has made various errors in the basic math calculations and in their own assumptions and therefore their estimates of  peak hour morning traffic are off by 23.9%.  Also, FASNY estimates that there will be 1.65 students per car.  Why did they not use a more reliable indicator such as actual experience of the German school with 1.30 students per car, a difference of 21.2%.

The key finding of our traffic engineer is that the new FASNY Plan “presents multiple safety hazards”.  In her report she states “Unrestricted access to multiple minor streets in the immediate area will result in innumerable safety hazards that cannot be mitigated without changing the nature and character of the affected neighborhoods.”  Our fire safety expert, states that “The FASNY proposal will lead to significant increases in fire response time from Fire Station 7 to a substantial part of the Gedney Farm neighborhood north of Ridgeway”.

Simply put, Ridgeway was not designed to accommodate this volume of traffic.  It is a narrow, curvy road with sharp changes in grade.  There is only one lane in each direction with no shoulder.  In total there are 98 streets, driveways, and other access drives that intersect with it from Old Mamaroneck Road to North Street.  The truth is, with anticipated congestion on Ridgeway, the local narrow streets in Gedney, Rosedale and Reynal Park will become the cut-through streets of choice for FASNY cars. FASNY’s proposal to restrict its access to Ridgeway is laughable but for the supposed seriousness that it was put forth.

The existing road network in this area is like “Swiss Cheese”. The streets in these neighborhoods were constructed close to 100 years ago before the advent of subdivision road specifications relating to width and configuration.  In more recent years cul-de-sac design was implemented to avoid cut-through traffic. Besides the substandard width these streets have no sidewalks.  The street network would make it very easy for drivers to funnel through these neighborhood streets to access the school, thereby creating hazardous conditions which will undeniably put our children, pedestrians and cyclists in danger.

Attached is a street map of the immediate area surrounding the former golf course property. Streets in Gedney, Rosedale and Reynal Park all have cut-through streets that will induce FASNY drivers to use them when Ridgeway gets congested as it inevitably will.   The streets that will be primary cut-through streets are outlined in orange.  Please note the number of homes that line these streets.  Also, please note the five schools outlined in red that are already situated in this area.  Note that the existing schools all front on arterial roads except Ridgeway which is defined as a local collector street in the City’s Comprehensive Plan.  Also, please note the three key intersections indicated in blue (North Street/Ridgeway, Mamaroneck/Ridgeway and Old Mamaroneck Road/Ridgeway).  All have current operating deficiencies with Mamaroneck Ave/Ridgeway being classified as a high accident intersection.

The Council should never have considered reopening this application. It is now clear that the obvious effort of the Stipulation was to crassly bypass the super-majority vote requirement for environmentally sensitive sites. It is a disgrace and disrespectful of the entire review process. The holding back of expert studies commissioned by the City confirming Parcel A as an environmentally sensitive site (ESS) until just before the Council Meeting casts a further cloud on the process.

In conclusion, the manner in which the entire ESS matter was handled was inappropriate to say the least.  FASNY somehow persuaded the Roach Administration and Council members Kirkpatrick, Smayda and Martin to revisit the ESS issue that had been decided in December of 2013.  In fact, FASNY itself accepted the 2013 Environmental Findings and identified the watercourse as a “stream” in their FEIS submission.  It was only after The Gedney Association submitted an environmental assessment from an expert that FASNY commenced their frivolous PR campaign calling the stream a “ditch”.

Reconsideration of Ridgeway follows the same pattern.  What was determined by the Common Council as an unacceptable access road to the FASNY is now being revisited.  None of the concerns raised in 2013 are different and use of Ridgeway and Hathaway Lane present innumerable and serious safety hazards for residents in the affected neighborhoods.

The traffic dangers posed by the FASNY plan, combined with environmental issues, incompatibility with the City’s zoning regulations and Comprehensive Plan plus the overwhelming opposition of White Plains residents should convince you once again of the unacceptability of the FASNY application.

Very truly yours,

John E. Sheehan, President
The Gedney Association’

 

(Editor’s Note: The following letter comments on the French American School of New York request for approval of a Special Permit and Site Plan to build a 7-building school campus on the former Ridgeway Country Club. The matter is expected to be scheduled for a vote in late May or June by the White Plains Common Council. For the record, the French American School of New York, contests that figures supplied by the Gedney Association Traffic Consultant mentioned in the above letter are not correct during an interview on White Plains Television “People to be Heard” recorded April 12, which can be seen at www.whiteplainsweek.com )

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DAN WELSH OF WESTCHESTER POWER ON SETTING NEW CLEAN ENERGY RATE FOR CONSTELLATION CON EDISON SOLUTIONS CUSTOMERS SEE THIS TIMELY INTERVIEW ON THE INTERNET NOW.

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PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE DAY LONG-AWAITED THE WESTCHESTER “SAVOR FOOD COURT” OPENS FIRST NEW RESTAURANT TODAY

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Whitman’s luxury burgers, sweet potato fries and more were the first new “tastes” of The Westchester to serve the public today in White Plains New York USA, with 20 shoppers lined up and enjoying the first new “taste” in the spacious luxurious dining areas at the Top of the Westchester

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Mighty Quinns to the right of Whitman’s was training staff for Monday’s opening.

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The pastoral balcony adjacent the spacious dining areas is a luxury touch

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WHITE PLAINS WEEK of APRIL 21 MUST SEE TV AVAILABLE INSTANTLY ON YOUTUBE, www, WHITEPLAINSWEEK.COM and www.wpcommunitymedia.org

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REAL NEWS FOR 16 YEARS WITH
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PUNCH WHITE PLAINS WEEK UP AROUND THE WORLD!
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THE APRIL 21 EDITION CAN BE SEEN NOW on  youtube at
 
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THE SMARTEST,  MOST RESPECTED  REPORTERS IN THE TRISTATE AREA ON

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THE STATE OF THE COUNTY ACCORDING TO ROBERT ASTORINO, COUNTY EXECUTIVE

THE STATE OF THE COUNTY ACCORDING TO CATHERINE BORGIA, DEMOCRATIC MAJORITY LEADER–EXCLUSIVE VIDEO.

SENATOR LATIMER RUNNING FOR MR. ASTORINO’S JOB GATHERS SUPPORT  FOR COUNTY EXEC NOMINATION GOING INTO DEMOCRATIC COUNTY CONVENTION MAY 10

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COUNCIL OF NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATIONS RAISES FEW ISSUES WITH CITY 

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ONE OF OUR NAVY ARMADAS IS GOING THE WRONG WAY: SEAN SPICER EXPLAINS IT ALL ON “DONALD TRUMP LIVE”

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THE WHITE HOUSE DAILY: REAL NEWS OR FAKE NEWS OR SPIN? WE TELL YOU ABOUT IT, YOU DECIDE.

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PLUS ANOTHER EXCITING, NOT TO BE MISSED, WEEKLY CHRONICLE OF “TRUMP THE PRESIDENT,” WITH TRUMP WATCHER, PETER KATZ

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Democrats Respond to County Exec Address, Tell their View of The State of the County

 CatherineBorgia

WPCNR COUNTY-CLARION LEDGER. From the Democratic Caucus of the Westchester County Legislator. April 21, 2017:

The following is the transcript of County Legislator Majority Leader Catherine Borgia’s televised response to the County Executive’s State of the County Address Thursday evening:

Good Evening; I’m Legislator Catherine Borgia, the Democratic Majority Leader of the Westchester County Board of Legislators.

Tonight, with plenty of pomp and circumstance, the County Executive expressed his opinions of the current state of Westchester. Here are the facts:

Under this Administration, our finances have been treated like a credit card. For years the County has been forced to borrow in order to meet basic operating expenses.

When you borrow money you have to pay it back – with interest.

Democratic Legislators like Ben Boykin have long warned of the enormous budget shortfalls from this practice – and last year, the County Executive’s budget stuck you with a $15 Million bill.

To fill this gap, Mr. Astorino tried to negotiate a backroom deal to effectively sell off the County airport to cover his own fiscal mismanagement. For a brief cash advance, Westchester would have lost millions in revenue in the long term.

Instead, Democrats compelled the Administration to conduct a fair and open process. Legislators, like Lyndon Williams, are working to ensure that any proposed airport privatization plan is the best deal for ALL Westchester taxpayers – even if that means no deal at all.

Moody’s Credit Rating Agency issued a list of three practices that would place Westchester County at the risk of a credit rating downgrade: First, they warned against borrowing for operating expenses, which the Astorino Budget did. Second, they warned against overestimating the County’s revenue from Sales Tax, which, again, the Astorino Budget did. Third, they warned against depleting our ‘rainy day fund,’ the Astorino Budget checked that box as well. See a trend here?

Democrats like Legislator MaryJane Shimsky have been fighting for funding of over $1 Billion dollars’ worth of needed repairs to our bridges, roads, and infrastructure while the County Executive asks for $25 Million for a new skating rink. Again, Democrats stepped up for the taxpayers and said no to that wasteful spending project.

This administration spends resources in the wrong places because of personal political ambition.

Democrats, like Ken Jenkins, have long advocated for a safe level of County police. Westchester has seen a 61% spike in opioid deaths, while the Narcotics Unit lost 20% of its personnel. The County’s actions have real life consequences.

Recently, Westchester County has seen an uptick in hate crimes that runs against our principles. Democrats like Alfreda Williams and Catherine Parker have repeatedly called for an accountable Human Rights Commission that tracks all incidents of hate and works with local police departments to stay vigilant and educate the public.

There has been a massive shift in the political climate around the country; and we’ve seen it here at home. I am in awe of the efforts taxpayers are making around Westchester to make their voices heard and hold those in office accountable.

The Astorino Administration has fully embraced the agenda of Donald Trump and these are NOT the values we as Westchester residents stand for. We believe in a Westchester County that gives all people an opportunity to thrive.

While Mr. Astorino welcomed and justifies a Gun Show where Nazi and Confederate Memorabilia were sold, we stood with thousands of taxpayers against the misuse of our County facilities.

Democrats are working hard for the creation of good jobs on innovative projects like the Bio-tech center development at North 60 while providing opportunities for minority and women owned businesses.

We also believe in just proposals like Paid Sick Leave so workers won’t have to choose between earning a day’s pay or taking care of their health or the health of their loved ones.

Every day we are fighting to empower families. That’s why we are working with local leaders from around the County on a task force that tackles issues like transportation and have proposed common sense measures like a drug take back bill aimed at combating the scourge of opioids in Westchester.

Our vision for Westchester embraces immigrants in our community. We have introduced the immigration protection act to help build a relationship of trust between our immigrant neighbors and the local police – while also taking a stand against the inhumane treatment by the Trump administration.

Lastly, we need policies that will put Westchester back on sound fiscal footing. Passing Democratic initiatives and putting wasteful lawsuits and pet projects behind us is the right place to start.

Westchester County is our home. Where Rob Astorino’s policies have set us back, Democrats have the plan to move all of us forward together.

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Astorino Promises No 2018 Tax Increase –ACTION ON OPIOID ABUSE–Touts “Astorino State of the County”

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Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino delivering his State of the County Speech Thursday evening at the Weschester County Court House. Photo, Westchester County Department of Communications.

WPCNR COUNTY CLARION-LEDGER. From the Westchester County Department of Communications. April 20, 2017:

In his 2017 State of the County Address, Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino on Thursday highlighted how Westchester is strong and growing stronger with safer streets, more people working, a greener environment and active economic development — all while keeping property taxes flat.

During the one hour-long address before a packed room at the County Court House in White Plains, the County Executive detailed progress on a number of fronts – notably Playland Amusement Park, a $1.2 billion science and technology hub in Mount Pleasant and unlocking $140 million in revenues at Westchester County Airport through a public-private partnership (Editor’s Note: now under review by the Board of Legislators.)

Since coming into office in 2010, Astorino has lowered or held the county tax levy flat, allowing taxpayers to keep $400 million in their own pockets. The County Executive pledged to send the Board of Legislators a balanced budget in the fall that once again will not raise the county tax levy.

“I was elected to stop the tax madness, and we did just that by stopping the out-of-control spending,” said Astorino. “The county budget today is less than the budget was when we took office in 2010, which is unheard of.  Taxes are still too high, but citizens and businesses know they can count on me to manage their tax dollars smartly and responsibly. And by the way, county government is running just fine on our $1.8 billion annual budget.  Essential services are preserved and strengthened, our economy is growing, our credit rating is the highest for any county in the state, and our reserves remain strong.”

Despite those strengths and assets, Westchester County must confront its vulnerabilities, Astorino said. After sharing a personal story of family who lost their 22-year-old daughter to heroin, the County Executive announced new plans to attack the growing crisis of opioid addiction that builds on the success of Westchester’s Safer Communities initiative, which tackles tough societal issues like school safety in an age of terrorism and youth suicide by mobilizing and coordinating community resources and expertise.

Called Project WORTHY – Westchester Opioid Response Teams Helping Youth – the program will build response teams involving experts in health, law enforcement and mental health and parents, students, clergy and coaches who will work together to:

  • Spot the warning signs of heroin and opioid abuse,
  • Understand the mental health causes of addiction, such as depression, anxiety or pain management,
  • Develop response strategies to pre-empt addiction.

Dr. Mark Herceg, Westchester County’s Commissioner of Mental Health, will lead the effort. Classes will be taught at central locations, such as the County Center, and teams will bring the program to schools and community centers.

“There is no illusion that this program will be a panacea,” said Astorino. “The work ahead will be tough, because the enemy is strong. But we go forward; confident we can and will make a difference. Because in the words of Teddy Roosevelt the worst thing you can do is nothing. That won’t happen in Westchester. We will continue to fight. Opioid addiction can be stopped, if we are all willing to take action against it, and we are.”

Astorino acknowledged the frustration and partisan divides dominating the public discourse across the country and spoke of the importance of listening to a public with opposing viewpoints and working with lawmakers and stakeholders in a balanced, persistent and bi-partisan manner.  He cited his popular Ask Astorino Town Halls as productive ways of communicating directly with the public.

“As the County Executive for close to one million people, it’s my job to find middle ground – balance what divides us – and that’s why I have been committed to bringing county government to the people of Westchester and listening to what is on their minds,” Astorino said. “Good government doesn’t come quickly. Our system of checks and balances invites setbacks … No single individual, group or party has a monopoly on the best ideas and the right way to run things. Westchester works best when we approach it as a team sport.”

Astorino noted gains made in private sector employment — nearly 44,000 new jobs since 2010 and a drop in the unemployment rate to 4.2 percent – while touting a number of other positive developments that make Westchester a desirable place to live and work, such as a 25 percent drop in crime; Westchester’s highly educated workforce; the county’s placement among the healthiest places in the country; its ranking as one of the top digital counties in the U.S., and a number of environmental initiatives, among other accomplishments.

During the speech, he also cited success in the County’s battle against homelessness – including Westchester’s Patriot Housing program that helped secure housing for over 500 previously homeless veterans – and, in a video, highlighted people who directly benefit from some of the County’s programs and services.

The County Executive also provided updates on several other key matters facing Westchester.

NORTH 60

Astorino and the Board of Legislators worked together to shepherd a proposed $1.2 billion Westchester Bio-Science and Technology Center.

Earlier this month, the county board approved a lease with Fareri Associates on 60-acres of county owned property at the Grasslands campus in Mount Pleasant that is poised to position Westchester as one of the world’s great innovation hubs – right alongside Cambridge, Mass., the Research Triangle in North Carolina, and Silicon Valley.

When finished, the new center will feature more than two million square feet of biotechnology and research facilities, alongside space for medical offices, shopping, a hotel and a Children’s Living Science Center.

The benefits of the North 60 project are that it will generate $9 million in estimated new real estate taxes; $7 million in estimated new annual rent to Westchester County and 12,000 jobs.

It’s adjacent to highways, close to mass transit, has access to the most educated workforce in the nation and is near world-class medical and pharmaceutical institutions like Westchester Medical Center, New York Medical College and Regeneron.

“As they say in real estate, it is all about location, location, location and the North 60 property on the Grassland’s reservation couldn’t be more ideally situated,” Astorino said. “This is a once-in-a-generation, game changing initiative. It doesn’t get any bigger or better than that.”

WESTCHESTER COUNTY AIRPORT

The County has the opportunity, under a Federal Aviation Administration program, to unlock revenues from Westchester airport to help pay for general services like police, parks, roads and day care. Westchester County is now seeking to enter into a public-private partnership as part of the FAA program.

Bids are due back in 90 days, and the concept has bi-partisan support from the Board of Legislators. The beauty of this plan is that it is expected to generate revenues of around $140 million for the County while not expanding the airport’s footprint or increasing the number of passengers.

“The idea is to create a long-term revenue stream so that money is coming into the County’s budget for decades to come,” Astorino said. “This will provide important relief to the ever increasing cost of government.”

PLAYLAND

In March, Westchester County won a decisive victory in New York State Supreme Court that allows the County and its partner, Standard Amusements, to invest $60 million into the world-famous park. The result will be new rides, new restaurants and new attractions in 2018. “The kids get more exciting rides and taxpayers get a break,” Astorino said. “Smiles all around.”

And the park will be up-and-running this season on May 13, 2017.

INDIAN POINT

The County Executive asked the Board of Legislators to join him in a lawsuit aimed at protecting taxpayers, ratepayers, students and communities directly affected by the eventual closure of Indian Point.

Astorino noted that at stake are the loss of billions of dollars; the loss of tens of millions of dollars in local revenues to Westchester County, the Town of Cortlandt, the Village of Buchanan and the Hendrick Hudson School District; and the loss of 25 percent of the electricity for nine million people in Westchester and New York City.

The lawsuit charges that the Governor failed to follow the State Environmental Quality Review Act, or SEQRA, before announcing plans to close Indian Point.

Westchester’s proposed lawsuit has nothing to do with the debate over nuclear energy, Astorino said. Its purpose is to ensure that any decision to close Indian Point fully protects the rights and safety of residents and environment by following the law.

“How is it that nuclear reactors at Indian Point can close and leave behind their spent fuel rods in a radioactive waste cemetery for a period of somewhere between 60 years and forever without requiring an environmental review?” said Astorino. “That’s the question our lawsuit demands be answered.”

FEDERAL HOUSING SETTLEMENT/HUD

Westchester County exceeded the requirements of the 2009 federal housing settlement to develop 750 units of affordable housing in 31 mostly white communities by December 31, 2016 by delivering 790 units with another 100 in the pipeline.

“Our success surprised a lot of people. None more than the bureaucrats in their far away desks in Washington,” Astorino said. “They saw our communities as the problem, when in fact they were the solution. HUD wanted confrontation and litigation. We got the desired results with cooperation and collaboration.”

ChickGalella

ARMONDO GALELLA RECEIVES WESTCHESTER’S HIGHEST HONOR

It is a county tradition to honor those who have served our nation. The County Executive presented Armando “Chick” Galella of Sleepy Hollow with Westchester’s highest honor – the Distinguished Service Award. Galella is one of the few living veterans to have fought at Pearl Harbor. He also was awarded the Bronze Star for his Meritorious Service during the invasion of Okinawa.

“His modesty is part of who he is,” Astorino said. “But it can’t mask the truth that he is a hero and an example to all of us.”

 

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LATIMER ANNOUNCES BROAD COALITION OF SUPPORT FOR COUNTY EXECUTIVE NOMINATION

 

3-ASTORINO LATIMER JENKINS

WPCNR CAMPAIGN 2017. From NY State Senator George Latimer. April 20, 2017:

George Latimer, Democratic candidate for Westchester County Executive, received the addition this week of two dozen new endorsements from local elected officials and Democratic Party leaders. This latest announcement comes on the heels of other recent major endorsements and further builds the State Senator’s momentum going into the May 10th Democratic convention.

 

“I’m honored to have the endorsement of so many friends and colleagues from across the county,” said Senator Latimer. “I’ve worked with so many of these great public servants in my capacity as State Senator, partnering with them on our shared goal of improving life for all Westchester families. I look forward to continuing our strong partnership as the next County Executive.”

 

“As Town Supervisor of Bedford I have worked closely and formed partnerships with elected officials on both sides of the aisle to help benefit our residents and businesses. George Latimer brings decades of knowledge and experience and a keen and thorough understanding of government. He knows how to get things done. He thoroughly understands what Bedford and Westchester needs. His responsiveness is quick, intelligent and effective. With impeccable integrity, George is guided by a firm moral compass. I am proud to support him for County Executive,” said Chris Burdick, Bedford Town Supervisor  

 

“I am proud to support George Latimer for Westchester County Executive. George has a real track record of making sure working families and young people entering the workforce have safe, decent homes they can afford. With costs of living going up and rents skyrocketing, I look forward to working with George to keep Ossining affordable and accessible for everyone,”
said Manuel Quesada, Ossining Village Trustee.
“George Latimer has constantly shown the work ethic, integrity, and compassion for all people that is vital to being an effective public servant. These are all characteristics that the people in the City of Peekskill and Westchester County deserve to have in their leaders. That is why I am proud to endorse George Latimer for County Executive,” said Kathleen Talbot Peekskill City Councilwoman.
This latest round of endorsements comes shortly after Latimer picked up the support of five Democratic Committees in Rye City, Rye Town, Harrison, Mamaroneck, and North Castle. With these, Latimer continues to build his early, strong coalition going into the May 10th Democratic convention, and further cement his appeal against Republican incumbent Rob Astorino.
The full list of the endorsers are as follows:

 

Tom Murphy, Mamaroneck Town Councilman
Barry Fertel, New Rochelle City Councilman
Barry Reiter. North Castle Town Councilman
John Martin, White Plains City Councilman
Dr. Chris DiGiorgio, Chair, Tuckahoe Village Democratic Committee
Emily Hurd, Rye City Councilwoman
Chris Burdick, Bedford Town Supervisor
Nancy Seligson, Mamaroneck Town Supervisor
Abby Katz, Mamaroneck Town Councilwoman
Ernie Odierna, Mamaroneck Town Councilman
Jaine Elkind Eney, Mamaroneck Town Councilwoman
Carol Miller, Larchmont Village Trustee
Peter Fanelli, Larchmont Village Trustee
Malcolm Frouman, Larchmont Village Trustee
Dan Brakewood, Port Chester Village Trustee
Danielle Taggar-Epstein, Rye City Councilwoman
Lorraine Walsh, Larchmont Village Mayor
Karen Schleimer, Mt. Kisco Village Trustee
Tom Nardi Rye Town Councilman
Leon Potok Mamaroneck Village Trustee
Dr. Peter Hoffman, Chair, Pelham Manor Democratic Committee
Luis Marino, Port Chester Village Trustee
Betsy Harding, Chair, Bronxville Democratic Committee
Manny Quesada, Ossining Village Trustee
Drew Claxton, Peekskill City Councilwoman
Victor Tafur, Mamaroneck Village Trustee
Kathleen Talbot, Peekskill City Councilwoman
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SATURDAY on People To Be Heard 7 PM: Dan Welsh Discusses Sustainable Westchester Process of Setting Next New Clean Energy Rate for 20 Cities/Towns and Strategy for Increasing Solar Energy Installations, Grid Compatibility.

 

SATURDAY NIGHT AT 7

ON EARTH WEEK EDITION OF

PEOPLE TO BE HEARD

7 PM SATURDAY ON VERIZON FIOS CH. 45 COUNTYWIDE

CH. 76 ALTICE CABLEVISION IN WHITE PLAINS

YOU’VE GOT

DAN WELSH

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

WESTCHESTER POWER

ON

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SETTING THE NEXT CLEAN ENERGY RATE–HOW CONSUMERS CAN KEEP IT WHERE IT IS

STATUS OF BUILDING NEW SOLAR ENERGY INSTALLATIONS 

NEW PROGRAMS FOR HOMEOWNERS TO INSTALL AND USE SOLAR ENERGY

COSTS AND CHANGES TO MAKE NORTHEAST POWER GRID CLEAN ENERGY COMPATIBLE

 

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GRAINGER HOUSE HOLDS DEDICATION CEREMONY MAY 12 TO CELEBRATE CITY RECOGNITION OF THE HOME AS A CITY LANDMARK, HOME OF PERCY GRAINGER RENOWED 20TH CENTURY PIANIST, COMPOSER PERFORMER

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PERCY GRAINGER HOUSE CELEBRATION OF  ACCEPTANCE AS A CITY LANDMARK AS THE HOME OF INTERNATIONAL COMPOSER MAY 12. 7 CROMWELL PLACE, WHITE PLAINS, 6 PM TO 8 PM, HORS d’OEUVRES, COCKTAILS, LIVE MUSIC. DEDICATION AT 6 PM FOR INFORMATION ON TICKETS, GO TO www.percygraingeramerica.org 2015723grainger 005

 

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White Plains Historical Society Honors Woman’s Club of White Plains Foundation President, Christine Roithmayr, as Citizen Extraordinaire May 4

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White Plains Christine Roithmayr, (right) shown awarding the HerHonor award last year as President of the Woman’s Club of White Plains Foundation. Her long service in fund-raising and philanthropy  and Woman’s Club of White Plains will be recognized at the annual White Plains Historical Society dinner May 4 at, of course, The Woman’s Club of White Plains6 to 9 PM.. For information on tickets go to www.whiteplainshistory.org Photo, The Woman’s Club of White Plains website.

 

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