WHITE PLAINS WEEK FRIDAY MAY 19 PROGRAM ON THE INTERNET NOW

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WHITE PLAINS WEEK for 5-19 has been posted. The YouTube link is
 
 
The Whiteplainsweek.com link is
 
JOHN BAILEY AND PETER KATZ
ON
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THE WHITE PLAINS SCHOOL BUDGET LANDSLIDE APPROVAL
IMPACT ON YOUR PROPERTY TAXES
GOVERNOR CUOMO ON THE $20 BILLION DOLLAR HOUSING PLAN
6-JACK HARRINGTON
JACK HARRINGTON REMEMBRANCE
THE FCC NET NEUTRALITY POLICY DOOMS INDEPENDENT WEBSITES
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PLAYLAND OPENING
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SANDROS RUSSO PLAYS PERCY GRAINGER MUSIC AT HISTORIC GRAINGER HOUSE LANDMARK DEDICATION
TRUMP THE PRESIDENT CONTINUES
THE HINDENBURG DISASTER REMEMBERED
ROGER AILES — THE MAN WHO CHANGED TELEVISION NEWS
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Governor Cuomo Signs Bill Starting Spending of $20 Billion for Affordable Housing Statewide

Governor Cuomo Announces Historic Funding to Combat Homelessness

WPCNR ALBANY ROUNDS. From the Governor’s Press Office. (Edited)May 20, 2017:

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo Thursday launched a landmark $20 billion, five-year plan to combat homelessness and advance the construction of affordable housing in New York State.

The action plan is made possible by the release of $2.5 billion in capital funding delivered in the FY 2018 Budget which will create and preserve more than 110,000 units of affordable and 6,000 units of supportive housing over the next five years. This marks the largest investment in the creation and preservation of affordable housing and efforts to end homelessness in the history of New York.

“This legislation is a major step forward for New York as we strengthen our efforts to combat homelessness and expand access to quality, affordable housing for our most vulnerable men, women and children,” Governor Cuomo said. ”By making significant investments in rehabilitating, preserving and constructing safe and affordable housing, we will open doors for low-income residents and support hard-working New Yorkers in every region of the state.”

The new legislation provides $2.5 billion in funding to advance the Governor’s $20 billion, multi-year homelessness and affordable housing plan.

To add critical supply to the state’s stock of affordable housing, the plan commits $10 billion to create and preserve more than 110,000 units across the state, including approximately 12,000 units created through the newly enacted “Affordable New York” program formerly known as 421-a.

The plan also includes a $10 billion landmark commitment to create 6,000 new supportive housing beds, including $7.5 billion to end the homelessness crisis and support housing programs, rental subsidies and other shelter costs in New York City and across the state.

By making significant investments in rehabilitating, preserving and constructing safe and affordable housing, we will open doors for low-income residents and support hard-working New Yorkers in every region of the state.

This historic investment offers a transformational blueprint to address the diversity of housing needs in New York, strengthen protections for tenants, and create new opportunities for low-to-moderate income households. The capital funding delivered in the FY 2018 Budget includes:

Supportive Housing: $950 million for the construction or operation of at least 6,000 supportive housing units throughout the state.
New Construction: $472 million for new construction or adaptive reuse of rental housing affordable to households that earn up to 60 percent of area median income.
New York City Housing Authority: $200 million for projects and improvements related at housing developments owned or operated by NYCHA.
NYC 100% Affordable: $100 million for the construction and preservation of 100 percent affordable units in New York City.
Senior Housing: $125 million for developing or rehabilitating affordable housing targeted to low-income seniors, aged 60 and above.
Rural and Urban Community Investment Fund: $45 million for mixed-use affordable housing developments that may include retail, commercial or community development components.
Middle Income Housing: $150 million for new construction, adaptive reuse, or reconstruction of rental housing affordable to households that earn between 60 percent and 130 percent of AMI.
Affordable Housing Preservation: $146 million for substantial or moderate rehabilitation of existing affordable multi-family rental housing currently under a regulatory agreement.
Mitchell-Lama Rehabilitation: $75 million to preserve and improve Mitchell-Lama properties throughout the State.
Public Housing: $125 million for substantial or moderate rehabilitation and/or the demolition and replacement through new construction of public housing authority developments outside of New York City.
Small Building Construction: $62.5 million for rehabilitation and/or the demolition and replacement through new construction of buildings of 5 to 40 units.
Home Ownership: $41.5 million for promoting home ownership among families of low and moderate income and stimulating the development, stabilization, and preservation of New York communities.
Mobile and Manufactured Homes: $13 million for mobile and manufactured home programs.
Main Street Programs: $10 million for stimulating reinvestment in properties located within mixed-use commercial districts located in urban, small town, and rural areas of the state.

Empire State Supportive Housing Initiative

In addition, the FY 2018 Budget continues the Governor’s commitment to provide supportive housing resources and services to address vulnerable populations experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Launched in 2017, ESSHI is a five-year program designed to fund the service and operating costs of at least 6,000 units of permanent supportive housing and to better coordinate resources from multiple-state agencies allowing more dynamic programming and quicker implementation.

Services offered through this initiative include employment and training opportunities, parenting education, counseling, independent living skills training, primary healthcare, substance use disorder treatment and mental health care, child care, and benefits advocacy are examples of what is provided to supportive housing tenants.

In 2016, New York set a record for financing the creation or preservation of more than 17,000 affordable homes and apartments and was the number one bond issuer in the nation with $2.8 billion issued. New York State Homes and Community Renewal’s Unified Funding housing round awarded more than $122 million for affordable housing in urban, suburban, and rural areas of New York. The awards are set to build or preserve nearly 2,000 affordable apartments and leverage more than $450 million in public and private resources.


 

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WP VOTERS PASS 2017-18 SCHOOL BUDGET WITH 85% VOTING YES TO $214 MILLION BUDGET. ELLER, STEIN VOTED NEW TERMS UNOPPOSED.

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IT WAS 9:25 PM TUESDAY EVENING WHEN MICHELE SCHOENFELD, CLERK TO THE BOARD OF EDUCATION POSTED THE FINAL TOTALS FOR TUESDAY’S WHITE PLAINS SCHOOL BUDGET ELECTION. TURNOUT WAS HIGHER THAN LAST YEAR AND THE MARGIN OF 86% OF THE VOTERS APPROVING THE BUDGET THIS YEAR WAS THE HIGHEST IN 17 YEARS.

UNOFFICIAL RESULTS for White Plains Schools:

 

Budget Vote:      Yes – 823

                              No  -  130

                                                  86.4% Yes Vote

 

Candidates:         Rosemarie Eller – 816

                              Randy Stein        -  799

 

 

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HEY MOM!

(This is for all you Moms out there. We know what you go through!)

“HEY MOM!”

Hey Mom– Bring me two waters so I’m set?

Where’s my underarmor? And my visor?

Are my tights washed? My skates are dull.

Hey Mom, can you call the advisor?

Hey Mom,  I wasn’t yelling at you.

I didn’t mean to! You were yelling at me!

You never let me do anything my friends do

Hey Mom, would you chill, lighten up, just do!

Hey Mom, I don’t like the way this looks for the prom -

I don’t like the color, how could you think this was me?

I just can’t wear this, it’s this, it’s that it’s…Oh, Mom!?! 

 

Hey Mom, I’ve been studying all morning getting knowledge.

Can’t I go out, I’ll be back by ten?

But, I know the material, gone over it again and again.

Oh, Mom – I hate my life! I can hardly wait until college.

 

Hey Mom – But I did call and let you know

Don’t you understand, I couldn’t call at that time.

No, you can’t not let me go – it’s a great band

Oh, Mom – I hate you! You never understand!

Hey, Mom, please don’t embarrass me at the game

By screaming so loud, it’s just so tacky

But, hey mom, I like that you’re over there in the stand

Watching me play, you know that don’t you Mom, you understand?

 

Hey Mom, can you get me to the rink

At 5 – I know you have to take off from work early?

Thanks, Mom, I’m so sorry but the team has a special thing

I have to be there, thanks Mom – I love you—really.

 

Hey, Mom, please when you pick me up at the dorm

Don’t come inside. Just wait outside, call me on the cell

I’ll be right down — it’s the norm.

Don’t ring the bell!

 

Hey, Mom, I’ve read the classifieds

There are no jobs, I can’t make all those calls.

Well, OK, I guess  I can send that resume you made for me (sigh).

OK, I’m lost, where’s the post office, down Lexington to what?

Hey Mom, well I’m bringing my friends by,

Don’t let Dad embarrass me with his jokes, OK?

I’ll just die if he’s silly again — you won’t let him do that?

You’ll talk to him about that?

All right, Mom I’ll take that extra course.

But I’ve just been going to school for months it never ends!

Can’t I have a little vacation, I don’t know what’s worse

Can’t I spend a little time with my friends?

 

You do like him Mom?

Oh, I hoped you would.

Yes, I really do

I am so glad you do too!

Hey Mom, can you take care of the kids this weekend?

We’re going to Vermont with a friend.

And Mom, the cats get kibble in morning and meat at night,

We love you mom, sorry for the short notice, talk to you tonight.

 

Hey Mom, I’m sorry I can’t see you Mother’s Day.

Are you all right, what will you be doing today?

Going to a play – great – you know we love you in every way?

Though we may not show it you’re always with us

even when you’re away.

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WHITE PLAINS WEEK THE MAY 12 SHOW ON THE INTERNET NOW.

THE

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LINE UP

PETER KATZ, JOHN BAILEY, JIM BENEROFE

WHITE PLAINS WEEK  for 5-12 IS ON the youtube link 
 
 
The whiteplainsweek.com link is –
 
 

ON

OUT WITH THE OLD WHITE PLAINS IN WITH THE NEW

HEROIN BUST  AFTERMATH–NOT WHAT MEDIA HAD INDICATED

SCHOOL BOARD INKS DR. JOSEPH RICCA FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS FOR 4 YEARS

SCHOOL BUDGET VOTE COMIN UP TUESDAY

THE EMBARRASSING WHITE PLAINS MIDDLE SCHOOL OPT-OUT RATE FROM THE MATH TESTS

WESTCHESTER COUNTY EXECUTIVE SUES GOVERNOR ON INDIAN POINT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW –VIDEO!

LATIMER

 ANOTHER QUIET WEEK IN THE NATION’S CAPITOL–

PETER KATZ REPORTS ON

TRUMP THE PRESIDENT

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THIS WEEK ON PEOPLE TO BE HEARD–AARON WOODIN — PERSONAL COMPUTER SECURITY EXPERT–ON THE STATE OF PERSONAL COMPUTER EXPERT ON THE INTERNET NOW.

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JOHN BAILEY, AARON WOODIN, PRESIDENT PC VENTURES and JIM BENEROFE. Photo by “RKO” Keith Baker, White Plains Television

WESTCHESTER COUNTY’S MOST RELEVANT AND TIMELY INTERVIEW PROGRAM

YOU’VE GOT

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AARON WOODIN

WHITE PLAINS COMPUTER TROUBLESHOOTER FOR 15 YEARS

ON

THE STATE OF THE PERSONAL COMPUTER WORLD TODAY

YOUR PERSONAL COMPUTER SECURITY

CONTEMPORARY COMPUTER SCAMS TO BE AWARE

THE SIGNS YOUR COMPUTER IS ABOUT TO CRASH

WHEN YOU SHOULD CONSIDER BACKING UP, OR PURCHASING NEW COMPUTER

THE SMARTPHONE JUNGLE WHAT’S AHEAD?

WHAT ABOUT THOSE OPERATING SYSTEMS?

SHOULD YOU ACCEPT EVERY UPDATE?

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INTERVIEWED BY JOHN BAILEY AND JIM BENEROFE

ON THE INTERNET, 

www.wpcommunitymedia.org

(GO TO WHITE PLAINS WEEK PEOPLE TO BE HEARD ON THE PROGRAM LIST)

 

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Latimer’s the One by a Country Mile. Democrats Count Votes Slowly. Latimer Overwhelming Choice after 48 Hours of Counting

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WPCNR CAMPAIGN 2017. From State Senator George Latimer’s Office. May 17, 2017:
Vowing to restore the focus of the office of Westchester County Executive on the needs of families after years of statewide politicking and poor fiscal choices by incumbent Republican Rob Astorino, Democratic New York State Senator George Latimer (D – Port Chester) secured his party’s nomination to run against Astorino in the November general election.
The victory culminates weeks of coalition-building among the dozens of municipal Democratic Committees countywide that formed the base of Latimer’s formidable results, which were tallied in a post-convention meeting this afternoon.
“I am honored and humbled to accept the Democratic nomination for Westchester County Executive,” said State Senator George Latimer. “I want to thank county Democratic leaders, members of the various local committees and our entire coalition of supporters for their hard work and their trust in me as we move forward to victory in November.
“We have a County Executive who is more concerned with pushing Donald Trump’s divisive agenda and furthering his own statewide political career than working for the people of Westchester. We have an opportunity to end Rob Astorino’s disastrous leadership and restore opportunity and prosperity to our county. I will build on our growing coalition to bring new voices and new ideas into the process, and be a County Executive that serves the people, and not the other way around.”
News of Latimer’s victory came this afternoon following a vote tally by party officials at the Westchester County Democratic Committee headquarters in White Plains. Party leaders had initially gathered in the city Wednesday night at the Westchester County Center for a convention to vote to nominate a candidate for the County Executive and other political posts. However, delays in the voting process for local judicial seats pushed the County Executive vote well into the night, prompting officials to postpone the vote count to Friday.
In terms of weighted votes, Latimer received 51,443 to Jenkins’ 20,585.5, giving the State Senator a substantial 71.42% of the total tally. Latimer ran the board across large swaths of the county, picking up 100% of the vote for the committees out of Bedford, Harrison, Mamaroneck, North Castle, Pound Ridge, Rye Town, Scarsdale, Rye City, and North Salem.
The State Senator also achieved a solid victory in many of the county’s cities, picking up 74% in New Rochelle, 81% in White Plains, and 75% in Peekskill.
Most notably, Latimer’s final tally included a strong showing in Yonkers, where Jenkins was heavily favored to win. In the end, Latimer held his opponent to a narrow loss of 55% to 45%.
This final count demonstrated deep, countywide support for Latimer, who got into the race late but mounted an aggressive and successful campaign to gather support among the county’s 45 local Democratic committees. This earned Latimer the support of a dozen committees and numerous local elected officials. The extent of this support was evident as party leaders stood to nominate Latimer’s candidacy at the convention.
“I’ve seen George in action fighting for the people in our communities. He has shown his kindness and warmth to everyone he meets. He is the leader needed to make Westchester County government reflect the needs of everyone, and not just the wealthy or powerful,” said Bianca Lopez, Port Chester District Leader in nominating Latimer.
“George Latimer’s vision for Westchester includes a county government that is here to work for all our residents and will advance the progressive values that really make up Westchester,” said David Imamura, former chair of Irvington Democratic Committee, who seconded Lopez’s nomination.
In his address to the convention, Latimer declared his intentions to work towards unifying the party going into the November election. This, Latimer noted, would be crucial in leading the party to victory in a race in which Democrats hold a 2-to-1 advantage in voter registration over Astorino and county Republicans.
At the same time, Astorino faces mounting pressure over the policies of Donald Trump, and criticism from Latimer and Democrats for his inattention to county needs as a past and possibly future gubernatorial candidate.
Latimer also took the time to address the likely primary challenge Jenkins is expected to mount. In an email message sent by the Jenkins campaign in the hours leading up to the convention, Jenkins Campaign Manager Joe Montalto told supporters that the candidate would follow “tradition in participating in the convention,” but ultimately intended to break with what he considered the tradition of having the party nominee face a Republican challenger in the general election. Latimer praised the work of convention delegates and welcomed the challenge as an opportunity to strengthen the party.
“The convention process isn’t just pageantry; I’m grateful for the Democratic leaders who come together from every corner of the county to voice their thoughts on how to lead this party forward and build a better, stronger future for the whole county,” said Latimer.
“My opponent plans to continue through the primary, and that’s a good thing. Primaries make our party stronger by giving voters choices and encouraging the best candidate to step forward and lead our party to victory. I fully intend to be that candidate, and I look forward to making the case to voters in the coming months.”
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Department of Home Security Statement on Ransomeware

WPCNR COMPUTER SECURITY. May 12, 2017:

The Department of Homeland Security is aware of reports of ransomware known as WannaCry affecting multiple global entities.  Ransomware is a type of malicious software that infects a computer and restricts users’ access to it until a ransom is paid to unlock it.  Microsoft released a patch in March that addresses this specific vulnerability, and installing this patch will help secure your systems from the threat. Individual users are often the first line of defense against this and other threats, and we encourage all Americans to update your operating systems and implement vigorous cybersecurity practices at home, work, and school.  These practices include:

  • Update your systems to include the latest patches and software updates.
  • Do not click on or download unfamiliar links or files in emails.
  • Back up your data to prevent possible loss, whether you are at a home, work, or school computer.

We are actively sharing information related to this event and stand ready to lend technical support and assistance as needed to our partners, both in the United States and internationally.  DHS has a cadre of cybersecurity professionals that can provide expertise and support to critical infrastructure entities.

DHS also leads the federal government’s efforts to protect civilian executive branch agency systems and networks. In partnership with each agency’s Chief Information Officer we are ensuring our own networks are protected against the threat.

For more information, DHS has previously released information on best practices to address ransomware. That information is available on our website at https://www.us-cert.gov/security-publications/Ransomware.

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No White Plume of Smoke from the County Center! County Democrat Convention Fails to Count Votes for County Executive. Tally Expected Friday

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WPCNR CAMPAIGN 2017. By John F. Bailey. May 11, 2017:

A delegate to the Westchester Democratic Party Nominating Convention at the County Center Wednesday night blamed a disorganized procedure for counting votes for several court nominations Wednesday evening for a convention that failed to nominate a candidate for County Executive.

He said “I was very disappointed in the way the convention was run. There were delays in counting the votes using laptops.

When the two County Executive candidates were nominated (County Legislator Ken Jenkins and State Senator George Latimer) the applause in the hall was overwhelming for Mr. Latimer compared to the reaction when Mr. Jenkins was nominated. I expect he will be the nominee.”

Our delegate continued describing Mr. Jenkins nominating speech as centered on his intent to run a primary against his contender for the nomination if he lost the nomination to Mr. Latimer.

The delegate described Mr. Latimer’s speech as respectful of Mr. Jenkins, and based on “values.” He said Latimer raised the theme that County Executive Robert Astorino had not governed with the values that county government mission was to help the poor, the sick, and persons who needed help.

 

 

 

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NYS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT RELEASES DRAFT EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT PLAN FOR PUBLIC COMMENT

 

Draft Plan Emphasizes Fostering Equity in Education for All Students

Expands Measures for School Accountability & Student Success

Requires School-Level Improvement Plans for Lowest-Performing Schools Overall and Among Certain Student Populations

Public Comment Accepted Through June 16 

WPCNR SCHOOL DAYS. From the New York Stated Education Department, May 10, 2017:

The New York State Education Department  Monday presented to the Board of Regents and released for public review and comment the draft Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan (summary available here), Commissioner MaryEllen Elia announced.

The draft plan emphasizes fostering equity in education for New York’s students; expands measures for school support and accountability, and student success; and requires school-level improvement plans for the lowest performing schools overall as well as schools with the lowest performance for certain student populations.

The plan also includes strategies for supporting the professional growth of educators and ensuring that all students, including English language learners/Multilingual learners, immigrant students, migratory youth, homeless youth, and neglected and delinquent youth have access to a well-rounded education that supports their academic and social-emotional development.

“We must seize this opportunity to reimagine the role accountability plays in improving teaching and learning in our schools,” Board of Regents Chancellor Betty A. Rosa said. “ESSA gives us the chance to shift to a more holistic approach to accountability – an approach that looks at multiple measures of school and student success that will evolve over time. It allows us to look at critical, but often overlooked, indicators of success, like children’s social and emotional growth and development. This is about educating the whole child.”

“Over the past year and half, we have taken a deliberative, transparent and inclusive approach to develop New York’s ESSA plan,” Commissioner Elia said. “Our goal is straightforward – we will submit to the U.S. Department of Education a plan that supports the development of highly effective schools, so our children will be equipped to lead successful lives. I cannot emphasize enough that this plan is a draft – that means it’s not yet done and we want feedback on it. We will make changes to strengthen it based on those comments.”

NYSED held more than 120 stakeholder and public meetings to gather input to help inform the development of the draft plan. The Department is also hosting 13 public hearings on the plan from May 11 through June 16 and is accepting public comment on the plan through June 16.

The full draft plan and a summary are posted on the Department’s ESSA webpage. The summary document outlines the Department’s stakeholder engagement process and highlights key proposals from the full plan.

Highlights of the Draft Plan

Fostering Equity in Education

In addition to meeting ESSA requirements, New York’s draft ESSA plan supports the Board of Regents’ goal of increasing equity in educational opportunities for all students across the state.  To that end, New York explicitly designed the State accountability system to require schools and districts to:

  • reduce gaps in performance among certain populations for students;
  • incentivize districts to provide opportunities for advanced coursework to all high school students;
  • continue to support students who need more than four years to meet graduation requirements; and
  • work with students who have left school so that they can earn a high school equivalency diploma.

Further, under the draft plan, the state will:

  • publish annual reports on per-pupil spending and equitable access to effective teachers per district;
  • identify inequities in resources available to schools and require districts to address these inequities in their improvement plans;
  • use Title I School Improvement Funds to increase diversity and reduce socio-economic and racial/ethnic isolation in schools;
  • develop state and local policies and procedures to ensure homeless youth are provided equal access to appropriate educational supports, services and opportunities;
  • create uniform transition plans for students exiting juvenile justice facilities; and
  • leverage the creation of P-20 partnerships to improve the quality and diversity of the educator workforce.

School Accountability Methodologies and Measurements

New York strives for an accountability system that supports all students, is transparent, prioritizes the measures that New York’s educators and families value, recognizes the good work that schools are doing, and accurately identifies schools that need the most help. The proposed revisions to New York’s school accountability and support system will improve teaching and learning and increase educational equity.

The Board of Regents is committed to evolving the state’s accountability and support system over time to add additional measures of school quality and student success. To achieve this, the Regents will form a workgroup to make recommendations on further measures to be added in the future.

School accountability strategies New York will implement in the draft ESSA plan include to:

  • expand accountability measures beyond English language arts and mathematics to also include science, social studies, acquisition of English proficiency by English language learners/Multilingual learners, and chronic absenteeism.
    • expand access to advanced coursework, particularly for students in less-affluent school districts, through the creation of a College, Career and Civic Readiness index;
    • add additional measures of school quality and student success over time. These could include such measures as students access to specific learning opportunities such as in the arts, science or technology courses; high school readiness for middle level students; postsecondary success of high school graduates; school climate and supports for students’ social, emotional and academic learning, as measured by student surveys and suspension rates; student access to highly qualified teachers; student access to diverse learning environments; and measure of student civic engagement;
  • establish five-year, long-term goals for closing achievement gaps; and
    • ensure a continued focus on students who need extra time to meet graduation requirements by including five- and six -year graduation rates in the accountability system.

Supports and Improvement for Schools and Districts

Under the draft ESSA plan, every three years the State will identify Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) schools based on the performance of all students and Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI) schools based on the performance of subgroups of students. CSI and TSI schools will be required to develop school-level improvement plans in partnership with stakeholders. The State will also annually recognize schools that are high performing or rapidly improving. In addition, the State will identify school districts for targeted support that have one or more CSI or TSI school or, as a district, has certain populations of students who performs at a CSI or TSI level.

The draft plan outlines the supportive role that the State will take in working with identified schools and districts and establishes a system that promotes best practices while also allowing schools to identify the most appropriate solutions to the barriers they face, rather than prescribing an abundance of one-size-fits-all requirements. The State will approach school improvement as a set of stages to be in done in partnership with identified schools and districts, as opposed to approaching school improvement as a set of stages to be imposed on schools and districts.  As part of this partnership, the State will provide multiple supports and opportunities for technical assistance to help schools identify and implement the specific solutions they need to address their specific challenges.

Requirements for identified TSI and CSI schools include to:

  • undergo a Comprehensive Diagnostic Needs Assessment that examines school quality, school data and resource allocation;
  • develop an annual improvement plan based on the Needs Assessment;
  • provide professional development connected to the improvement plan; and
  • determine the effectiveness of their improvement efforts through an annual review and parent, teacher and student surveys.

The State will provide a robust system of supports to identified schools and districts to assist them throughout each of these stages.  Additionally, after the initial year of identification, the State will prioritize its support each year to any CSI school not making gains. While this differentiated approach is intended to provide the most support to the schools that need the most assistance, should a CSI school be re-identified as a CSI school, the school will be placed in receivership whereby the district superintendent or an independent receiver will have enhanced authority to manage the school. Schools that are currently “Priority Schools” will immediately be placed under receivership if they are identified as CSI.

Supporting Excellent Educators

The Department’s efforts to improve all students’ access to effective educators includes work with preparation programs, higher education providers, districts, BOCES and educators. To support educators and improve the quality of teaching and learning, the Department will:

  • leverage partnerships among institutions of higher education, other preparatory programs and public schools to create additional opportunities for candidates in teacher and school building leader preparation programs to have robust, field-based experiences that allow them to apply what they learn in the classroom and demonstrate that they have acquired the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities to provide effective instruction and effective leadership earlier in their careers.
  • examine existing pathways to certification for both teachers and school leaders to ensure that existing structures are not creating unintended barriers for promising candidates to enter the profession.
  • assist school districts in creating comprehensive systems of professional learning, support and advancement for all educators – including those who are new to the field – along the entire continuum of their careers.

Supporting English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners

Of New York’s 2.6 million public school students, 8.8 percent are English language learners/Multilingual learners. New York will seek to improve teaching and learning as well as educator effectiveness by setting challenging, but attainable, goals for the state’s ELLs/MLLs. The draft ESSA Plan will enable ELLs/MLLs to develop English language proficiency, as well as access the state’s Next Generation Learning Standards, through the provision of high-quality instruction and support. The Department proposes to:

  • exempt recently arrived ELLs/MLLs in their first year of enrollment from the ELA exam. In addition, New York will propose to use such students’ ELA scores in the second year of enrollment only to set a baseline for future growth and achievement in the third year. In past practice, ELLs/MLLs’ ELA scores in the second year were used to measure achievement, rather than to set a baseline;
  • use a Transition Matrix Table for incorporating ELLs/MLLs’ growth toward attainment of English language proficiency into state accountability determinations; and
  • determine each district’s effectiveness in providing ELLs/MLLs with academic instruction that meets their needs through a self-evaluation tool.

Supporting All Students

New York believes that the highest levels of learning can occur when students and educators learn and teach in environments that are safe, supportive, and welcoming to all.  To support this belief, New York will:

  • support districts to reduce bullying, harassment and the overuse of punitive and exclusionary responses to student misbehavior while promoting positive disciplinary practices, improving school climate and providing students with social-emotional supports;
  • work with districts to build positive school climates based on inclusive, equitable school cultures that recognize student diversity;
  • promote strategies to effectively engage parents and family members in their child’s education at the state, district and school levels; and
  • require schools and districts to collaborate with relevant community partners when conducting a comprehensive needs assessment and creating improvement plans based on such assessments.

Challenging Academic Standards and Assessments

New York is completing a two-year collaborative process with educators to revise the Next Generation English Language Arts and Mathematics Learning Standards to ensure that they continue to be rigorous and challenge New York’s students. In December 2016 New York adopted new science standards that have a focus on experiential learning; those standards become effective in 2017-18.

Once the application is released by the U.S. Department of Education, New York will apply to participate in the Innovative Assessment Demonstration Authority that will provide states the opportunity to work with selected school districts to pilot new approaches to assessment. During the pilot period these assessments can be used to meet federal participation and accountability requirements.

Stakeholder Engagement

For the past year, NYSED has coordinated and engaged diverse groups of stakeholders to solicit recommendations on how to craft an ESSA plan that best meets the needs of the state’s students, schools and communities. In these efforts NYSED established an ESSA Think Tank with representatives from more than 100 organizations, including district leaders, teachers, parents, community members and students and consulted with national education experts regarding ESSA, including Linda Darling-Hammond (Learning Policy Institute), Scott F. Marion (National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment), and Michael Cohen (Achieve).

In addition, NYSED held more than 120 fall and winter regional in-person meetings across the state in coordination with the state’s 37 Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) and the superintendents of the state’s five largest City School Districts, which were attended by more than 4,000 students, parents, teachers, school and district leaders, school board members, and other stakeholders.

Next Steps & Process for Submitting Public Comment

NYSED is accepting public comment on the draft plan through June 16 in writing and at 13 public hearings. Department staff will provide a summary and response to the comments received to the Board of Regents at the July meeting.  It is expected the Board will vote on adopting a final version of the ESSA State plan in September.

Once the Board approves the ESSA plan, the State Education Department will submit the plan to the USDE for review and approval on September 18, 2017. After the plan is approved by the USDE, the Department will work with BOCES District superintendents, superintendents, the ESSA Think Tank and other stakeholder groups to develop and provide guidance on implementing the ESSA plan.

Comments can be submitted via email to ESSAComments@nysed.gov(link sends e-mail) with “ESSA Comments from (sender/organization name)” in the subject line. Comments submitted via mail should be sent to the attention of Dr. Lisa Long, New York State Education Department, Office of Accountability, 4th Floor, 55 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, New York 11217. Comments will be accepted through June 16.

 

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