Playland Pool is Here to Stay: Legislator Parker

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Westchester County Legislator Catherine Parker  at Playland on its Opening Saturday May 20, where she told WPCNR exclusively that Standard Amusements had agreed not to develop the Playland Pool site and the county would fund approximately $10 Million to rehabilitate the pool. Monday night the County Legislature voted 15-2 to approve the funding of $9.5 Million. Standard Amusements still is awaiting resolution of the City of Rye lawsuit that was recently thrown out by the courts on the grounds that the City of Rye had no standing to make the final approval of how Playland is redeveloped when Standard supposedly takes over. The City of Rye is considering whether to appeal that court decision. Standard Amusements has yet to forward their first payment on the 30 year arrangement, which is contingent on whether Rye appeals the suit and continues the legal battle for “Final Cut,” whether it is Rye that approves park changes or the County(which owns the facility).

WPCNR PLAYLAND GO-ROUND. From County Legislator Catherine Park. June 19, 2017:

Legislator Catherine Parker (D-Rye) is pleased to announce tonight passage of an Act which will authorize work to rehabilitate the historic pool at Playland Park. The Act, which has a cost of nearly $9.5M, passed with a 15 to 2 vote. When completed, the residents of the Sound Shore will continue to have the public pool that they have had since 1927.

“During the long process to get to this point I made clear that due to costs, a public amenity such as Playland Pool could never be replaced by high priced private club memberships,” said Parker. “Furthermore, I heard from countless residents & local officials about the serious concerns they had with the any alternative options to the pool.”

The issues most concerning residents were quality of life related such as noise, litter, and rowdiness close to a quiet neighborhood as well as the concern that a new restaurant would detract from efforts made at Rye Town Park with their new restaurant.

“We were very pleased with Standard Amusements’ understanding of the importance of this pool, and importance of keeping it a pool, to the surrounding communities,” added Majority Leader Catherine Borgia (D-Ossining). “I look forward to working with Standard as we continue our partnership at Playland.”

Legislator MaryJane Shimsky (D-Hastings-on-Hudson), Chair of the Committee on Infrastructure, expressed her excitement to get this project going. “The Astorino Administration has long stalled on the work needed at Sprain Ridge Pool, making the rehabilitation of Playland Pool all the more important. Westchester residents pay taxes and expect adequate services in return, I am thankful that we can finally get to work on this long debated but always needed undertaking.”

“I commend my colleagues on the Board and Standard Amusements for their dedication to this piece of Playland history,” concluded Parker.

 

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LECUONA REFLECTS ON FATHER’S DAY

John,
Jim Valvano once said, “My father gave me the greatest gift anyone could give another person, he believed in me.” This quote embodies what my father meant to me.
My father Luis Lecuona died over 22 years ago.  Even though he is no longer here, I know I am making him proud living my American dream, just like he would want me to do. His love and support has played an incredible role in making me the person I am today. Yo amo a mi padre.
Today we reflect on one of our greatest teachers in life, our fathers. Please take the time to thank your father or a father you know for all their hard work.
Sincerely,
Milagros
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County Cities and Villages, Towns Called on to Come Up with Sharing Services Plan(s)

WPCNR COUNTY CLARION-LEDGER. From the Westchester County Department of Communications. June 19, 2017:

Westchester Leaders Discuss Shared Services at Forum

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County Executive Robert P. Astorino, joined by leaders of more than 40 municipalities throughout Westchester County, came together yesterday with a shared goal of lowering property taxes.
The Shared Service Forum, which was chaired by Astorino and included representatives from nearly all of Westchester County’s municipalities, discussed ways that local governments can cut costs and pass on savings to taxpayers, notably through sharing services and lobbying the state to stop passing down their costs.

“Lowering taxes must be a priority in Westchester County and throughout New York State,” Astorino said. “In Westchester County, we’ve held the line on spending with our $1.8 billion budget. Since taking office seven years ago, we’ve either lowered the property tax levy or kept it level. And I am again committed to a budget for 2018 that doesn’t raise taxes. Residents can’t afford higher taxes. So it’s critical that we all work together to find savings to pass on to taxpayers.”

During his remarks, the County Executive cited how the county’s property levy is actually 2 percent lower than when he took office and discussed a number of other ways the county has been sharing services in recent years with localities, such as consolidating village police departments with the county, providing specialized police units to cities and towns in need, and utilizing the county’s planning and land use experts to develop a master plan for the Village of Rye Brook.

The daunting challenge, he added, were federal and state mandates totaling $1.35 billion that are forced on the county and account for 75 cents out of every dollar spent in the county’s 2017 $1.8 billion budget. The largest state mandate, for example, is Medicaid and costs Westchester taxpayers $210 million. New York is one of the few states that forces counties to pay part of that bill. Other mandates include pensions, child welfare, probation, public assistance and special education, among others.

Westchester County in 2013 created its Shared Services Handbook, a guide for local communities on how the county can help lower the costs for local governments. The state’s Shared Services Initiative, which was included in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s 2018 state budget, mandates that 57 counties throughout New York State (New York City is excluded) establish a Shared Services Panel that will come up with ways for governments to share and coordinate services.

Thursday’s meeting was the first in a series of meetings that the Shared Services Panel in Westchester will conduct until Sept. 15, 2017 when the panel is required to vote on a plan. County Executive Astorino and municipal officials will be compiling a report on services already being shared as well as working on new initiatives to save taxpayer money.

“The best way to reduce taxes is by growing the economy, controlling costs and eliminating burdensome mandates.” Astorino said. “Sharing services is part of a broader strategy aimed at protecting taxpayers.”

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WHITE PLAINS WEEK ON THE TEACHER CONTRACT, THE COUNTY’S SERVICE CONSOLIDATION CONFERENCE AND MORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 RKOTower
White Plains Week recorded 6-15-17 has been posted on the INTERNET
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the youtube link is
 
 
 
the whiteplainsweek.com link is
 

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JIM BENEROFE

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 JOHN BAILEY

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PETER KATZ

ON

THE WHITE PLAINS TEACHERS NEW 2 YEAR CONTRACT

THE BATTLING ROBOCALLS ON THE MAYORAL RACE

SCAMS AND CRIMES AGAINST THE ELDERLY TO WATCH FOR

TRUMP THE PRESIDENT– THE EXCLUSIVE WEEKLY REPORT

ROB ASTORINO TRIES TO BELL THE CATS–CREATING A COUNTY SHARED-SERVICES PLAN FOR THE GOVERNOR

SEE IT 

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16 YEARS WESTCHESTER’S MOST RESPECTED NEWS PROGRAM

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TOUR WHITE PLAINS HOSPITAL CANCER CENTER ON THE INTERNET AND SATURDAY AT 7PM ON VERIZON FIOS 45 AND ALTICE CABLEVISION CH. 76

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LAST WEEK WHITE PLAINS HOSPITAL SALUTED OVER 200 CANCER SURVIVORS IT HAS HELPED BECOME CANCER FREE

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REBROADCAST, JOHN BAILEY INTERVIEWS

UNA HOPKINS

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White Plains Teachers Head On the Memorandum of Agreement: “A Fair Contract”

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Kerry Broderick, President, White Plains Teachers Association calls contract “product of good conversation.” WPNCR File Photo

WPCNR SCHOOL DAYS. By John F. Bailey. June 12, 2017:

The head of the White Plains Teachers Association issued this statement today on the Board of Education approval of the Memorandum of Agreement the Board approved last night on the proposed new contract with the Teachers.

“The agreement is the product of good conversation of the needs and parameters of both the district and the teachers. It is a fair contract.”

WPCNR, asked if the Step Level increases, and automatic extra year of service added for existing 1st year, 2nd and 3rd year teachers affected tenure. She said the step level upgrade did not:

“Contract negotiations have no relationship with tenure. Tenure is a state law and is about being granted due process rights.”

On the effect of the salary negotiations on pensions, Ms. Broderick explained:

“In order for a teacher to retire with full pension benefits, they must have a minimum of 30 years of service at 55. Should a person retire with fewer than 30 years, there is a substantial penalty on the pension payout. Once a teacher reaches 62, the penalty on the pension is lifted as the payout is determined by years of service. The payout is determined by your Final average salary (your final 3 years or your highest 5 years), your age, and years of service (2% per year of service to a max of 60% of salary. Tier 5 and Tier 6 are much less. You can look at NYSTRS.org for more information.”

Only the salary portion of our contract negotiations impacts our pension.”

 

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New 2-Year Teachers Contract Memorandum of Agreement Approved by Board, Now It’s Up to the Teachers Union to Accept it.

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Acting Superintendent of Schools for the White Plains City School District, Dr. Howard Smith confirmed the Board of Education Acceptance of the Memorandum of Agreement on a new two year contract with the White Plains Teachers Association at the School Board last night. WPCNR File Photo

WPCNR SCHOOL DAYS. By John F. Bailey. June 12, 2017:

Dr. Howard Smith, Acting Superintendent of Schools for White Plains, in an exclusive statement to WPCNR announced a tentative Memorandum of Agreement for a new 2-year contract with the White Plains Teachers Association, if the Teachers vote to approve the new contract. Smith’s statement:

“The Board approved the contract contingent upon approval by vote of the full Teachers Association membership.  So it would be inappropriate for me to comment until we have received confirmation of ratification by the Association. “

The White Plains Teachers Association on their website set the vote on the new contract for June 20

The Memorandum of Agreement is a 2-year contract beginning in 18 days, July 1, 2017. It increases all Step Salary levels 1% and in addition elevates all present teaching staff to the next step level, in their next year.

New teachers beginning July 1st will receive the 1% increase applied across all 20 Step  levels. This raises the salary of a 1st year teacher with a Bachelor of Arts to $56,161 (from $55,605,currently).

Teachers already on staff today will receive 3 to 5% more salary next year, because their status will be raised one step above what they would be eligible for in the previous contract. They get a year’s increase in step pay which they would not have gotten until next year under the previous contract.

The Memorandum of Agreement also increases teachers’ payments of their health insurance portion .75% the next two years from 13.5% this year to 14% beginning July 1, and 14.25%, July 1, 2018.

Asked if pensions were affected by the advancement in the step status of present staff, Dr. Smith explained to WPCNR they were:

“Pensions are determined by a formula based on years of service at the time of retirement in a position covered by the State Retirement System and an average of highest salaries earned by the retiring teacher during their service.  So a teacher’s future pension will increase as a result of step movement on the salary schedule in 2017-18 representing both another year of service and a higher salary.”

The Memorandum of Agreement also increases teachers’ payments of their health insurance portion .75% from 13.5% this year to 14% beginning July 1, and 14.25%, July 1, 2018.

The cost for the portion of payment a family health  plan the teachers are responsible for is $3,458 , s single plan is $1,544, beginning July 1. On July 1, 2018, those costs go up to $3,672 and $1,639. These shares of currently on staff teachers paying the cost of their health insurance are partially and sometimes completely covered by the effects of the automatic step to the next increased step level they will be receiving, a level of salary  they would not have been eligible for until July 1, 2018.

The Memorandum of Agreement if the teacher union members agree to it in their vote next Tuesday, gives them better compensation than if they choose to continue to work under the Triborough Agreement (in lieu of a contract in place).

One example:  if you have a Master of Arts and are eligible for Step 2 salary, under the new Memorandum of agreement you receive $69,702 beginning July 1. If the Triborough plan is opted for (by rejection of the contract proposal), that M.A. would only receive $69,012. On July 1, 2018, that MA now at Step 2, would be more ahead, because they would receive $73,111  compared to $71,671 under the Triborough agreement.

The MA now who would reach Step 4 as July1, 2018 is $2,130 ahead of what they would receive if the Teachers Union votes to turn down the Memorandum of Agreement  The presently on-staff teachers  receive approximately the salary  increase equivalent of one  year more of service under the former contract.

 

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SCHOOL BOARD CONSIDERS NEW TEACHERS CONTRACT MONDAY.

CURRENT STAFF REWARDED WITH RAISES OF 3 TO 5% A YEAR.

TEACHERS MUST PAY 14% of HEALTH INSURANCE, THEN 14.25% THE NEXT YEAR.

 FUTURE 1ST YEAR TEACHERS ACROSS ALL STEP LEVELS HIRING SALARY INCREASE: 1%.

MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT APPROVED BY BOARD OF EDUCATION

WPCNR SCHOOL DAYS. BULLETIN By John F. Bailey. June 9, 2017 UPDATED JUNE 14,2017:

The White Plains City School District and the White Plains Teachers Association have come to a Memorandum of Agreement rewarding current members of teaching staff with approximate raises of 3 to 5% over the next two years, and raising new teacher hires salaries 1%.

Teachers at the highest paid levels receive 1% increases plus longevity increases.

The Board of Education approved the memorandum of agreement Monday evening, June 12. The teachers will on whether or not to accept the contract June 20.

It is an interesting new contract,  according to the memorandum of agreement— based on White Plains Teachers Association documents:

 “Effective July 1, 2017, Teachers will move up one step and 1% will be placed on the salary schedule. Effective July 1, 2018, Teachers will move up one step and 1% will be placed on the salary schedule.”

A Step is the level of salary taking into consideration a teacher’s present educational degree and number of years served in the district.

For example, if you were hired by the White Plains Schools this year (2016-17) and hold a Masters of Arts degree and it’s your first year with the White Plains School District, your salary is $63,672.

 However, if you have MA and have been with the school district 10 years through this year (2016-17), your salary this year was $89,476.

Under the proposed new contract that first year salary (Step 1) for a new teacher with an MA hired by the district for the 2017-18 academic year would increase 1% to $64,630.

 Each of the 20 Step pay levels are increased across all degree levels and years with the district. Each Step Level would increase 1%.

The effect —  this allows the district going ahead to hire replacement teachers new in their first year to the district at only 1%  salary increases going forward at all academic degree levels. This is a significant saving.

For teachers on staff already, it is a different story:

 Under the new Memorandum of Agreement all current teachers are automatically increased one Step effective July 1, and another Step on July 1, 2018. This automatically adds two more years of service (and its commensurate step pay)  when you have only worked for the district one more year.

In the 2nd year of the contract present staff  automatically get a raise to their next step in sequence. The effect: Present teachers gain two years in longevity and degree pay for their next two years.

Here’s how this works to the staff teacher’s advantage: If you are completing your 2nd year this month as an MA teacher with the district,  you will automatically move to Step 3 reflecting 3 years experience instead of the two you have just completed, but you are not actually skipping a level, but you are moving to a higher level of pay than you would have gotten under the old contract that increases your pay more than 1% because you are at a higher level of pay presently than a new teacher in their first year with the district:

You move from $66,454 which you made in 2016-17 (just completing your 2nd year) to $69,702  (new Step 3 pay), which is a 5% raise in pay. You get a higher pay in your third year of the district.

In the second year of the proposed contract, starting July 1, 2018, the beginning of our MA 2 year hire, entering his or her fourth year he or she automatically is raised to Step 4 (4 year pay) with three years experience. They then get automatically jumped to Step 4 pay  of $73,111 – a 4.9% increase from $69,702, the salary in 2017-18. 

(WPCNR would like to clarify that teachers on staff are not skipping a step to a higher level, but rather moving up to a new higher step in sequence.)

The increases in pay are partially reduced by the proposed increases in teachers’ health insurance premiums.

The insurance premiums proposed in the Memorandum of Agreement go up ½ % to $3,672 for a family plan to $1,544 for a single person in the first year of the contract and another ¼% to 14.25% in 2018-19 to $3,672 for a Family to $1,639 for a single person plan.

The contract salary increases generated by the automatic increase to the next Step level should the teachers approve the contract  (if the Board approves it at Monday’s meeting) guarantee the White Plains new Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Joseph Ricca, at least a year and a half of labor peace with his teachers as he settles into the school district.

The contract negotiations with the district began March 28 and after 5 subsequent meetings, agreement was reached May 30.                                               

There are changes in work schedules also included in the new contract.

These are the proposed new pay schedules with the last year of the old Step Schedule so you can figure out the pay increases  generated by the increased 1% in the Step levels and the automatic advancement to the next step for onstaff teachers the next two years:

Current Step Levels

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New July 1 2017-2018 STEP LEVELS

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NEW JULY 1 2018-19 STEP LEVELS

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These charts may be viewed at www.wptaonline.org

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WHITE PLAINS WEEK ON THE TRAFFIC IMPROVEMENTS OF THE CROSS WESTCHESTER EXPRESSWAY TO HANDLE THE NEW NY BRIDGE TRAFFIC DEMAND. NOW ON YOUTUBE AND THE WHITE PLAINS WEEK WEBSITE

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THE LOCAL NEWS BREAKERS BUSTING BIG STUFF

EVERY WEEK FOR 16 YEARS–BAILEY, BENEROFE AND KATZ

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THE TRANSIT LINK CHANGES TO THE CROSS WESTCHESTER EXPRESSWAY ENTRANCE AND EXIT RAMPS.

THE NEW BUS STATION LOCATIONS IN WHITE PLAINS, NY USA–THE TIMETABLE!

EXCLUSIVE WHITE PLAINS WEEK VIDEO OF THURSDAY NIGHT TRANSIT LINK PRESENTATION IN WHITE PLAINS WITH KEY EXECUTIVES.

THE EXPERIENCE WITH RAMP METERING IN L.A., S.F., CHICAGO

TOM ROACH ROBOCALLS DEMOCRATS AS PETITION SIGNATURES FOR PRIMARY SOUGHT

MILAGROS LECUONA “DISGUSTED” WITH CITY DEMOCRATIC PARTY LEADER “ANTI-IMMIGRANT” STANCE

WHITE PLAINS SCHOOLS APPROVED FOR K-SOLAR PANEL INSTALLATIONS AT TWO SCHOOLS.

GOVERNOR CUOMO ON FIGHTING THE GLOBAL WARMING FIGHT.

TRUMP THE PRESIDENT: TONIGHT’S EPISODE “DONNIE AND THE FEDS”

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WORLDWIDE INSTANTLY

ON YOUTUBE AT

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PETITION SIGNING BEGINS IN WHITE PLAINS WITH MAYOR’S ROBO CALL CALLING ON DEMOCRATS NOT TO SIGN PETITIONS FOR ANY CANDIDATE BUT HIM AND HIS SLATE OF MARTIN, KIRKPATRICK AND BRASH. LECOUNA TELLS MAYOR HE DOES NOT WALK THE WALK FOR IMMIGRANTS

WPCNR CAMPAIGN 2017. June 8, 2017:

The gathering of signatures for contenders for Mayor and the Common Council began last weekend with the leader of the Democratic City Committee sending a letter to registered Democrats (who are eligible to vote in the September primary where incumbent Mayor Tom Roach, incumbent Councilmen John Martin and James Kirkpatrick and nominated Justin Brasch are being contested by Councilwoman Milagros Lecuona and democratic challengers Michael Kraver, Alan Goldman, and Saad Sidicci.

The Democratic City Committee Chair letter urged  Democrats to stick together and accused Mr. Goldman of being anti-immigrant, and criticised his Republican background.

Milagros Lecuona responded to the Chairman’s letter, calling on Mayor Roach to ask the Chairman to resign for his alleging Mr. Goldman was against immigrants.

Last night in the early evening, Mayor Roach contacted Democrats with a 45 second, recorded RoboCall message from what appeared to be a private company number (888-414-7752–not the city number 422 exchange)

The Mayor’s message said this:

“Hello, this is Tom Roach with a message about the petitioning process in my election campaign. This message is paid for by Friends of Tom Roach.

I’m pleased to have been endorsed by the White Plains City Democratic Committee, but I do have an opponent. So, I’m asking my supporters to be careful and only sign the petitions for Mayor and City Council that include me and my running mates.

We’re headed in the right direction. Let’s keep White Plains a progressive leader in our region. Thank you for your support.”

 

This morning in response to the Mayor’s apparent lack of response to her call for the Chairman’s resignation,  Ms. Lecuona circulated a news release accusing  the Mayor of “talking the talk” on immigration support, but not “walking the walk.”

Here is a copy of that news release:

“On Thursday, June 1, 2017, Common Councilwoman Milagros Lecuona issued a statement condemning the White Plains Democratic City Committee Chairman Tim James for an email he sent to the City Committee entitled “Sticking Together”. In the email, the Democratic chairman Tim James falsely claimed that Common Council Candidate Alan Goldman was anti-immigrant.  In her previous statement, Councilwoman Lecuona called on Mayor Roach to put politics aside and to stand with her in calling Tim James to resign from his position as Chairman of the White Plains Democratic City Committee. Mayor Roach has not responded.

“I asked the Mayor to put politics aside, and to stand with me in asking Tim James to resign,” said Lecuona. “What Tim said was callous, offensive, and completely out of line. Mayor Roach has not responded. In his silence, Mayor Roach has sent a loud and clear message that he will talk the talk on standing with immigrants, but clearly he won’t walk the walk.”

Lecuona continued, “I am an immigrant who had to watch the heartbreak of her own child go through the deportation process. What Tim said goes far past politics, and it is time that the Mayor stops doing the political thing and does the right thing.”

The letter from the White Plains Democratic City Committee Chair that began the petitioning campaign, distributed June 1:

Dear Fellow City Committee Members and Friends:
 
First, a reminder that we will be handing out petitions (and sharing pizza) next Monday evening, June 5.  (But no taking signatures until the following day — the first legal day of petitioning!)  See the attached flyer for details.
 
Second, I want to stress the importance of unity, and of getting behind the candidates who won the support of the City Committee via our fair and democratic endorsement process.  
 
The Nominating Committee interviewed all candidates, accommodating the candidates’ schedules as needed, and extended the process to allow for new candidates for Common Council after Beth Smayda announced her decision not to seek re-election.  Per our party rules, anyone who was not recommended by the Nominating Committee was entitled to contest the endorsement  on the floor at the endorsement meeting if nominated by a single District Leader.  By that method, Milagros and all three of her running mates had their names placed in nomination.  By the time of the endorsement meetings in March and April, however, it was so clear to them that they lacked sufficient support among the members of the City Committee that Milagros and two of her running mates withdrew in advance of the voting, and in advance of the discussion among City Committee members that was to precede the voting.
 
One of the reasons we have been a highly successful local party is because we have enjoyed a high degree of unity.  One aspect of that has been respect by our members for the decision of the majority after contested votes on endorsements and other important matters.  Without that kind of ethic, no party organization can be effective.  It is what gives real meaning to our endorsements and other major votes.
 
So, I want to urge all District Leaders to support and work for our endorsed candidates, regardless of your initial preferences.  A couple of months ago, one District Leader, in telling me that he might work against our endorsed candidates — or at least some of them — in a primary, stressed what he called “conscience.“ I certainly do not want to denigrate the importance of conscience in politics.  We would be better off if we saw more of  that in our politics.  But not every disagreement of difference of preference rises to the level of a matter of “conscience.”  (Or the term would have no meaning.)  From my perspective, neither Milagros nor her running mates have articulated — in public or in private — the kinds of major differences on policy or principle that rise to that level and warrant a departure from the normal custom among City Committee members of respect for the decision of the majority — in this case, overwhelming majorities.
 
Indeed, it is hard to tell what they — as a slate — stand for.  Milagros and two of her running mates are fellow Democratic District Leaders, whose views, to the best of my  knowledge, are well within the mainstream of the City Committee and of White Plains Democrats generally – which is equally true of our endorsed candidates for City office:  Tom Roach , John Martin, John Kirkpatrick and Justin Brasch.  But the fourth member of Milagros’s slate, Alan Goldman, is a very different story.  By his own admission when he spoke to the Nominating Committee, Mr. Goldman was a lifelong (now age 69) Republican until he changed his party registration to “Democratic” on October 11, 2016 – just in time, legally, to be able to run for office as a Democrat this year.  And Mr. Goldman did not even claim that his change of party enrollment was based on any change in his lifelong political views.  On the contrary, he told us flatly that he had changed his party enrollment because “There is no Republican party in this town” and that it was what he had to do “[I]f I wanted to run for office.”
 
And not for nothing was Mr. Goldman a Republican.  When he was asked during his Nominating Committee interview for his thoughts on how the City should deal with the problem of illegal occupancies in certain neighborhoods, he told us:  “We gotta get the INS involved,” referring to the former name of the Federal agency now known as “Immigration and Customs Enforcement” (ICE).  Can you imagine any of our endorsed candidates giving that answer?
 
Mr. Goldman’s presence on Milagros’s slate makes clear the incoherence of that slate.
 
(End)

The same day the Chairman sent out the above letter, Ms. Lecuona distributed this news release protesting the Chairman’s comments is as follows:

“On Thursday, June 1, 2017, White Plains Democratic City Committee Chairman sent an email to all Committee People with the subject line “Sticking Together,” calling for “unity” against Democratic City Councilwoman and Mayoral Candidate Milagros Lecuona, and her slate for White Plains Common Council. Committee Chairman Tim James callously described local businessman Alan Goldman as opportunistic and anti-immigrant.

“As an immigrant and a member of the Hispanic community, I found this email disturbing. Tim James has never had to live through the heartbreak of watching his own child suffer through the deportation process. I have.”

“I am absolutely disgusted that Tim James would ever insinuate that a close friend of mine is anti-immigrant, much less that I would run with someone who harbors any anti-immigrant sentiments,” said Lecuona. “Alan Goldman is an exceptional human being and is running because he wants to see bold change in our City. The fact that the Chairman would ever stoop this low and attack a Democratic candidate just speaks to the need for change.”

Councilwoman Lecuona continued, “I’m calling on Mayor Roach to put politics aside and to stand with me in asking Tim James to resign. What he said was callous, offensive and unacceptable.”

Lecuona is an immigrant from Spain who moved her family to White Plains in 1987 to pursue their American dream. A trained architect and urban planner for the last 35 years she has served on the White Plains Common Council for the past 9 years. During her time in office Lecuona has taken on powerful interests on behalf of the people of White Plains.  Entering public service was a natural progression given her lifelong community involvement.  She has been the recipient of multiple recognitions and awards.

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