MIDHUDSON ON TRACK TO OPEN TUES FOR PH. 1 REOPENING. LONG ISLAND, WEDNESDAY. LONGER, CLEANER TRAINS FOR LIRR. CAMPGROUNDS OPENING. PRO LEAGUES INVITED TO OPEN TRAINING. FACEMASK MANDATORY ON ALL PUBLIC TRANSIT.

WPCNR SUNDAY GOVERNOR ANDREW M. CUOMO CORONAVIRUS BRIEFING. From the Governor’s Press Office. May 24, 2020:

Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that New York professional sports leagues will be able to begin training camps in state while following appropriate health protocols.

Governor Cuomo also announced the members of the state’s Blue-Ribbon Commission focused on improving telehealth and broadband access using new, innovative technologies. The Blue-Ribbon Commission is being chaired by former CEO and Executive Chairman of Google and founder of Schmidt Futures, Eric Schmidt. Members of the Commission include:

·         Richard Parsons – Chair, Rockefeller Foundation

·         Darren Walker – President, Ford Foundation

·         Dennis Rivera – Former Chair, SEIU healthcare

·         Plinio Ayala – President/CEO, Per Scholas

·         Charles Phillips – Chair/Former CEO, Infor

·         Sid Mukherjee – Physician/Author, Assistant Professor at Columbia

·         Jane Rosenthal – Co-founder/CEO/Executive Chair, Tribeca Film Festival 

·         Dr. Toyin Ajayi – Chief Health Officer & Co-founder, Cityblock Health

·         Elizabeth Alexander – President, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

·         Martha Pollack – President, Cornell University

·         Steven Koonin – Director, NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress

·         Satish K. Tripathi – President, SUNY Buffalo

·         Hamdi Ulukaya – Founder/Chairman/CEO, Chobani

·         Maurie McInnis – Incoming President, SUNY Stony Brook

·         Ginny Rommety – Chair, IBM

The Governor also announced the Mid-Hudson Region is still on track to enter phase one of reopening on Tuesday, May 26th, and Long Island is still on track to reopen on Wednesday May 27th if deaths continue to decline. Both regions’ contact tracing operations are expected to be online by those dates.

The Governor also announced the MTA will be taking steps to protect Long Island Rail Road customers as Long Island moves towards phase one of reopening. The MTA is cleaning and disinfecting trains and buses daily, and the LIRR is ready to add more cars to trains to help with social distancing.

The Governor also reminded New Yorkers that wearing a mask or face covering is mandatory when riding on public transportation systems.

The Governor also announced that more than 10,000 households on Long Island have received Nourish New York products. Additionally, six new Nourish New York distributions are scheduled for Long Island this week. First announced by the Governor on April 27th, the Nourish New York Initiative provides relief by purchasing food and products from Upstate farms and directs them to the populations who need them most through New York’s network of food banks. The state is also asking any philanthropies or foundations that would like to help the state’s food banks to contact COVIDPhilanthropies@exec.ny.gov.

The Governor also announced that campgrounds and RV Parks will be allowed to open statewide tomorrow, May 25th. Veterinarian practices will also be allowed to open in all regions beginning Tuesday, May 26th.  

VIDEO of the Governor’s remarks is available on YouTube here and in TV quality (h.264, mp4) format here.  

AUDIO of today’s remarks is available here.

PHOTOS will be available on the Governor’s Flickr page.

A rush transcript of the Governor’s remarks is available below:

Good morning. Pleasure to see all of you here today. Let’s talk about where we are today. First, on the facts first. Total number of hospitalizations is down, that’s good news. The rolling average of hospitalizations is down, that’s good news. The intubations is down and the new cases are up a little bit on the rolling average, but all part of the decline. That’s all good news. Number of deaths ticked up, which is terrible news, but the overall line is still good. The 109 families that lost a loved one, they are in our thoughts and prayers. 

We’re at the beach. Beaches in New York State, State beaches are open. Jones Beach, the Sunken Meadow Beach, Hither Hills, Robert Moses Beach. Camp grounds, RV parks open tomorrow and we’re excited about that. We remind all New Yorkers to be smart in what they’re doing.

We’re now decidedly in the reopening phase and we’ve been following the numbers from day one. No emotions. Following the science, not the politics. This is not a political ideology question. This is a public health question. It’s about a disease, stopping the disease, stopping the spread of the disease and that’s science, it’s not politics. 

We have all the numbers posted for all regions in the state. We want people to understand the numbers, we want people to understand what’s going on because it’s their actions that determine our future. Informing the people of the State, that’s what I’ve done from day one every day and that’s what we’ll continue to do. Also, we feel that this is a case of first impression. We’ve never been here before. We’ve never been here before in our lifetimes. That’s true, but the country has been through this before and you learn from the past so you don’t make the same mistakes. 

When we went through this in the 1918 pandemic, you go back and you look at the places that opened in an uncontrolled way and you see that the virus came back and came back with a fury. Again, it’s not about what you think, ideology, this is what we know. These are facts. You go back and look at what happened in the 1918 pandemic in St. Louis. Go look at Denver where they loosened up too quickly and the virus came back. 

Article in the paper today, the Washington Post. 24 states may have an uncontrolled growth of the virus. They’re talking about California and Florida may still see a spike in the number of deaths, okay. Those are all facts, and they reinforce the point that we’ve been making. Follow the numbers, follow the science. And we have done just that. That’s why you see our curve is coming down where many places in the country the curve is going up.

Remember what happened to us was no fault of our own. Actually, it makes the point, because what happened to us was we did not have the facts when this started. everybody said the facts were the virus was coming from China. Those were not the facts. The virus had left China. The virus went to Europe and nobody told us. And people came from Europe to New York and to New Jersey and to Connecticut. And 3 million European travelers came, January, February, march, before we did the European travel ban. And they brought the virus to New York and that’s why the New York number was so high. We didn’t have the facts. We were not informed. But, once we got past that, and we were in control, we have been smart. And smart has worked. We just have to stay smart. Even though it’s been a long time, and people are anxious, we have to stay smart. You keep watching those numbers.

The Mid-Hudson is still on track on the numbers to open Tuesday. Long Island is on track to meet the numbers on Wednesday. We have to get the number of deaths down on Long Island and we have to get the number of tracers up, but we’re doing that. We’re preparing for long island to open. We’re getting the transportation system ready. The Long Island Rail Road is run by the MTA. They’re going to be cleaning and disinfecting all trains and buses every day, first time ever. We never disinfected buses and trains before, we never thought we had to. But we get it now, and they’re doing it every day. They’re going to add more cars to the trains so people can space out and socially distance when Long Island opens. I want people to remember that the mask is mandatory on public transportation. I think you’re making a mistake, a grave mistake, if you don’t use a mask in your own personal life. We know that it works. We know that the first responders have a lower infection rate than the general population because they wore the masks, so I think if you don’t wear the mask in your personal comings and goings you’re making a mistake. But I do know, as governor, you’re going to subject other people in the public to your behavior then you have to wear a mask when you can’t socially distance, and that’s true on public transportation.

Starting today, all the New York professional sports leagues will be able to begin training camps. I believe that sports that can come back without having people in the stadium, without having people in the arena, do it. Do it. Work out the economics if you can. We want you up. We want people to be able to watch sports to the extent people are still staying home. It gives people something to do. It’s a return to normalcy so we are working and encouraging all sports teams to start their training camps as soon as possible and we will work with them to make sure that can happen.

All veterinarian practices will begin on Tuesday. That is a service that is necessary and has been necessary for a period of time. That’ll start on Tuesday and I want people to remember that there are people who have paid a very high price, everybody has paid a high price for what we have gone through.

Some people have paid an extraordinarily high price. You have people who literally do not have enough to eat. The demand on food banks has skyrocketed. That’s true all across the state. It’s true here on Long Island and we encourage people who want to make donations, philanthropies who want to make donations, to make them for the purpose of food banks. You know this is a period where it gets very basic. Do you have housing and do you have food? Let’s make sure no New Yorker goes hungry.

Also, as we go forward, we have been talking about the light at the end of the tunnel and we are dealing with it today in the here and now but we also have one eye on the future and when we finish getting through this, which we are, we have to start talking about building back better – not just building back – building back better. Same attitude we had here on Long Island after Superstorm Sandy, devastated Long Island, I said I don’t want to just replace what was. We went through too much pain and we learned too much just to replace what was. Let’s build back better, a new power grid, new more resilient homes, new more resilient roads so when Mother Nature comes back, and she will come back with a furry, we are in a better position because we learned from Superstorm Sandy. Let’s do the same thing here.

What, do we really think this is the last time we are going to have a public health emergency? Does anyone really believe this is the last time like Superstorm Sandy? “Well, it’s a once-in-500-year-flood.” Yeah, sure once in 500 years. It happens three times a year now. This can’t be once in 500 years. There are new rules. I believe there is going to be another public health emergency, different virus, this virus, some other public health emergency. Learn from this and build back better. We asked Eric Schmidt, who is a former CEO, executive chair of Google, who is very good at seeing issues and seeing possibilities to chair a commission for us to look at the situation and say how do we learn from this and how do we prepare going forward and we put together a Commission that is going to work with him that represents all aspects of the state, all aspects of the economy but I want them to get to work and I want them to come up with ideas. Let’s make sure we are better for what we have gone through and start preparing for a new chapter in this saga.

We are writing history in New York. We are writing history in America. That’s what we are doing. We are writing history for a whole modern day governmental and societal response. Chapter one was dealing with the emergency – stabilizing the health crisis. That was chapter one. We have just about completed chapter one. We have started chapter two which is reopening after you have stabilized health crisis. And we are starting to write chapter two. Chapter three, which we are going to begin preparing for soon is rebuilding and recreating the economy. I don’t believe this economy just bounces back. I don’t believe it is going to be enough just to go back to where the economy was. Too many small businesses have closed. You will see many of these corporations are going to use this as an opportunity to lay off workers. I believe that. Many businesses who have gone through this period where workers were at home. They had fewer workers. They used more technology and they are going to decide that “Well, we don’t need as many workers.” That is going to happen. You will have people who decide I don’t want to go back to work. I would rather stay home and do it from home.

So, we are going to need to stimulate that economy and government has a role to play in that, it always has. How does government stimulate and lead the way to these new economic opportunities? How does that Eric Schmidt commission come up with new ideas that we can jump start to grow the economy? That is what the next chapter is going to be about. It is going to be about government working with the private sector, working with businesses to jumpstart the economy, to stimulate it, to get some big projects going that get the business sector engaged and confident and believing once again. Gets people into a position where they will invest once again because they believe in the economy. Build new airports, which makes this nation more competitive. That is what we are doing at LaGuardia. That is what we are doing at JFK. This nation hasn’t built a new airport in 25 years. When are you going to start? Now is the time to start. How do you improve the mass transit system? How do you rebuild all these roads and bridges that have been failing for so long? Everybody talks about it. Nobody has done a darn thing. How about new technology for education? How about new telemedicine? We learned not ever but he has to show up at the doctor’s office. Let’s invest and build that new health care system. We talk about a new health care system that can do testing and tracing and has surge capacity and hospital beds. Let’s build that new public health system and let government get ahead of it and let government lead the way.

New York State has led the way in so many difficult times in history. New York was the first. I am not just saying that as a New Yorker, “There they are, those arrogant New Yorkers.” Read the history books. Read where FDR came up with his great ideas. He used New York as a laboratory when he was a governor and then he brought them nationwide. But we were the first. We started it first and people looked to New York for guidance and for example. And New York was bold and was creative. They talk about the New York energy, the New York mojo. Yes, that is New York. We did things that other people didn’t think could be done, and we did it over and over and over again.

We are at Jones Beach today. Jones Beach is indescribably beautiful. Yes. It is also something else. It was a tremendous feat of ambition and vision meeting competence. Jones Beach, built by Robert Moses, you know what is funny about Jones Beach when he started to build Jones Beach? There was no beach. There was no beach. People assume you have a beach because Mother Nature of each there. There was no beach. This was all built. This was all marsh. This is seven miles of fill. They filled a seven-mile-stretch, 14 feet high. It took so much fill that they dug the channel, a canal, and used that fill to build a beach. How ambitious. “You want to build a beach seven miles long, 14 feet of fill, well that’s impossible.” No, they did it in three years. And it was a marvel, because they believed in themselves. Because you had smart government. You had competent government. People believed in government and they do again, because government did work for people here. It saved lives. So, let’s get that kind of ambition back. Let’s get that kind of optimism back. We built New York. Mother Nature didn’t build this. She gave us a beautiful harbor, but everything else was built and we did it and we can do it again. That is what it means to be New York tough and smart and united and disciplined and loving.

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NEW YORK TALENT SAYS: “WEAR A MASK”

WEAR A MASK–An entry in the New York State Wear A Mask Public Service Spot Contest. 92,000 votes have been cast as of Friday, This Spot was telecast on the Governor’s Daily Coronavirus Briefing Friday.
“Wear a Mask. Do your part. Save a Life. It May be your own.”
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Social Distancing Disregarded in Greenburgh Parks: Supervisor Mulls Special Hours for Fragile Population

WPCNR THE FEINER REPORT. . By Greenburgh Town Supervisor Paul Feiner. May 24, 2020:

I have received e mails and calls from residents in recent weeks advising that many people are not social distancing or wearing masks on bike paths, parks, trails. This is happening all over Westchester, NYS, the nation and world!  Most people do comply. But those who don’t risk infecting others or getting sick with COVID-19 themselves.  For those with medical issues — it could be extemely dangerous.

I spoke with the Parks Commissioner and Police Chief and suggested that we set up a time (probably early in the AM) at one park with extra police, park personnel present so that people who have compromised immune systems can enjoy the trail -knowing that we will be making a greater effort to enforce the social distancing/health and safety COVID-19 REQUIREMENTS 

My question: If we would set this up – would you be interested in participating?  There are many miles of bike paths, trails, parks around town. It’s impossible to have a police officer at every spot on a trail all day and many people are refusing to comply with the social distancing directives.

If you would be interested = would an 8 AM to 10 AM time period be helpful? Any thoughts or suggestions you have would be appreciated. Please e mail to pfeiner@greenburghny.com.  When I brought this up at the Greenburgh Town Board work session last week the suggestion was to try it once a week.  However, if there is greater interest and need the program could be expanded.

If this works it’s my hope that other governments will do the same – providing more options for those with compromised immune systems to enjoy nature

AN EXCERPT FROM A WOMAN WHO IS SEVERELY IMMUNE

COMPROMISED

As a very concerned citizen, I wanted to let you know that community members are not looking out for one another at all, and it is really upsetting. So many people including runners and bikers are not wearing masks or social distancing, especially on the weekends.

There are so many people on weekends that it is nearly impossible to social distance on some parts of the path, and so many people out there just don’t seem to care about others at all. Tons of adults and kids biking without masks–so many that I had to wait about 5 minutes standing off the path while one biker after another passed by.

People running without masks and not social distancing at all while they breathe heavily and run right by. I happen to be severely immune compromised. 

I just think it’s such a shame that this is the way people are treating one another. As the weather gets warmer, it’s only going to get worse, and action needs to be taken. I literally feel like I can’t go outside without feeling in harm’s way, and it’s a great health risk


ANOTHER EXCERPT FROM AN  E MAIL RECEIVED FROM A WOMAN WITH CANCER  ABOUT ANOTHER TRAIL IN TOWN–

Thank you for soliciting feedback on Greenburgh trail use. I I run into few people there at that time (more people on weekends) and many weekday users seem to be regulars. I often see two women walking closely together sans masks. The most unnerving is an unmasked woman seen several times over these months including yesterday morning with an unleashed dog. On the weekends there are frequently parents with young children walking the trails sans masks. 


I am recovering from a year of cancer treatment which just ended two weeks ago. I walk/jog with a bandana every day mostly to protect others since quarantine began. It seems there are still many in our community who don’t realize how our behavior correlates with the quarantine timeline. 
WESTCHESTER RE-OPENING  –LINK TO WHAT IS ALLOWED ON TUESDAY AND DURING OTHER PHASES

On Tuesday our area will start re-opening. This is a link to what is allowed and not allowed.Phase 1 allows in curbside, in store pickup and drop off, construction, wholesale and manufacturing.https://forward.ny.gov/industries-reopening-phase

PAUL FEINER Greenburgh Town Supervisor

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NEW YORK BY THE NUMBERS

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo confirmed 1,772 additional cases of novel coronavirus, bringing the statewide total to 359,926 confirmed cases in New York State. Of the 359,926 total individuals who tested positive for the virus, the geographic breakdown is as follows (MIDHUDSON REGION COUNTIES HIGHLIGHTED BOLDFACE:

CountyTotal PositiveNew Positive
Albany1,77014
Allegany440
Broome48517
Cattaraugus784
Cayuga763
Chautauqua729
Chemung1361
Chenango1180
Clinton951
Columbia3593
Cortland381
Delaware742
Dutchess3,79326
Erie5,552155
Essex360
Franklin201
Fulton1934
Genesee1912
Greene2172
Hamilton50
Herkimer1005
Jefferson720
Lewis190
Livingston1140
Madison3014
Monroe2,66160
Montgomery770
Nassau39,726118
Niagara92730
NYC197,266782
Oneida86436
Onondaga1,90476
Ontario1822
Orange10,19755
Orleans19621
Oswego993
Otsego681
Putnam1,20013
Rensselaer4633
Rockland12,93429
Saratoga4524
Schenectady6483
Schoharie490
Schuyler110
Seneca540
St. Lawrence1961
Steuben2400
Suffolk38,802130
Sullivan1,29710
Tioga1213
Tompkins1492
Ulster1,60611
Warren2493
Washington2251
Wayne1073
Westchester32,881114
Wyoming801
Yates373
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INTERVIEWS WITH WORLD WAR II AND KOREAN WAR VETERANS

WPCNR THE LETTER TICKER. From Greenburgh Town Supervisor, Paul Feiner. May 23, 2020:

Greenburgh veterans, most from World War II and the Korean conflict, have been interviewed for a town history project  that started about a decade ago and each of their half hour interviews can be seen non stop on Greenburgh cable TV local access TV stations this weekend.

About 150 veterans have been interviewed for this program.  Because each interview is about a half hour long and because there are more than 150 interviews the interviews will be broadcast non stop from this entire weekend till Tuesday morning.

The interviews will air on channels 75 and 76 on Optimum  and on channels 34 and 35 on Verizon FIOS. Copies of the interviews are also available for viewing at the Greenburgh Library. You can view individual interviews at

http://greenburghpublicaccess.com/veterans-living-history

 Some of the veterans who were interviewed for this living history initiative are no longer alive but their stories and bravery will be remembered for generations to come. We’ve been airing our living history interviews for about a decade and continue to interview more veterans every year.  It’s important for residents to recognize the contribution of local heroes and to recognize that our neighbors fought hard to keep us free. 

Residents who don’t want to stay up the entire Memorial Day weekend can watch individual tapes on the Greenburgh public access TV website

http://greenburghpublicaccess.com/veterans-living-history

Paul Feiner

Greenburgh Town Supervisor

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BULLETIN: Westchester and rest of MidHudson region can open Tuesday if Tracer Training is Completed over the weekend. Long Island has to get death rate down. GOVERNOR Says he will not close borders/quarantine out of state/foreign arrivals—but Federal Government can. 2 week Interval Between Phases is not set—depends on Stability of New Infections.

GOVERNOR CUOMO ON BREAKTHROUGH DEATHS DROP BELOW 100 –AND MIDHUDSON OPENING TUESDAY(Albany Feed)

WPCNR SATURDAY GOVERNOR ANDREW M. CUOMO BRIEFING

By John F. Bailey. May 23, 2020:

Westchester County is working to train over 800 more “Tracers” of persons (mostly Westchester County employees who have had contact with Coronavirus-infected people, via online training this Memorial Day Weekend, Governor Andrew Cuomo reported today.

If the persons complete the training in Westchester, all the counties in the MidHudson region can open for Phase 1 in Reopening Tuesday. If Long Island Nassau and Suffolk Counties control their death rates below the 8 deaths over 3 days average, the Long Island region could open Wednesday

The Governor also said the Jones Beach crowds at yesterday’s beach openings socially distanced very well.

The Governor announced good news that Deaths yesterday from the Covid-19 virus dropped to 84, below 100 for the first time which the Governor described as 100 being the key number told him by a doctor was the number that would indicate the disease was stabilized. Of the 84 deaths, 62 died in hospitals, 22 from nursing homes.

The Governor emphasized citizens who have been tested, should consider testing a second time. He said that 1/3 of persons found to have coronavirus had not shown symptoms. The Center for Disease Control has determined that persons with the coronavirus may not show symptoms so would have no reason to test. Take as many as you want the Governor suggested if you deal with the public in stores, in hospitals, health centers if you deal with the public.

He showed some more “Wear a Mask” spots submitted to the state Wear A Mask PSA contest.

He sad, “those masks can save your life or another person’s life.”

Asked in the “Q. & A.” session if 2 weeks was still the time between Reopening Phase 1  and 2, the government said it was firm, because the 14 days is the time when symptoms would be appearing if persons contracted the disease. The Governor said if the numbers were “stabilized” after two weeks, you might be cleared to go to Phase 2 in the entire region. The Governor said 2 weeks was not “set.”

When asked if he would consider how to stop a second wave, banning travelers from other states and other countries coming into New York, the Governor said “I do not think it is a  good policy.”

Governor is asked about banning travelers from other states to prevent a second wave.

The Governor said the state does not have the authority to quarantine persons coming in from the airports, but the federal government can.  (See WPCNR statement obtained from the Center for Disease, below.)

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Letter from the Burns

WPCNR THE LETTER TICKER. May 23, 2020:

Musings from JBFC Programming Director Brian Ackerman

Well, I’ve sat down to write something many times over the last two epic months. Something about film, about life, about the Burns. Something to the extended family of JBFC members that have made this 19-year cinematic journey so gratifying—certainly to me, and I know for many others, too. But as soon as I’d write something, three days later it would be irrelevant, obsolete, like the world on its axis had shifted yet again, and erased everything of meaning. We’re all still bobbing at sea, hoping it’s not too deep. And the only thing I realize I can say with enduring clarity is this: I miss everybody.

We have zoom meetings at the “office.” We’re trying to figure out, of course, how we will open, when, and who will show up when we do. Obviously we will let you know FIRST once we have any certainty, but at the moment it’s a bit of an equation with twenty variables where only one is known: we will, indeed, re-open!

Beyond that, as a programmer I have more time, but productivity is in short supply, like flour. Time stretches out. Weekdays blend into weekends. Someone I know has a Covid problem, or thinks they do—time is spent wrangling ever-elusive solutions. I sleep badly. I wake up too early. I read the news, and then try to expunge it by reading more—a very bad stratagem. I wonder what we’re running out of, that will require a high-wire dash through the supermarket, where everything of course has been brought to us by people who are working every day, hour after hour, in perilous conditions that I don’t share. In other words: I’m pretty much like a lot of people—privileged and, so far, pretty lucky. I constantly remind myself of that. So many others are less fortunate.

In that way I am ridiculously lucky to watch movies, too —some for the Burns, some just for pleasure. I will say sheepishly that one of the best things I’ve seen in a long time is not something that would have shown up on any big screen, but rather the HBO adaptation of Elena Ferrente’s My Brilliant Friend. If you haven’t seen it, it’s simply epic. Epic in its sweep of personal histories intersecting; epic in its illustration of why, as a species, we just can’t get it together. It so beautifully expresses how we’re all operating from such deep wounds, such ancient traumas, that everything we do in the present is a fractured reflection of our past, as we cast about blindly to repair or avert some inaccessible, oblique pain that nonetheless drives everything we do. And yet all that brokenness is what makes the story—and all of us—so beautiful. It’s essential watching.

We’re also showing two documentaries this week on our virtual screens that are really terrific: The Painter And The Thief, and Capital in the Twenty-First Century. The first is about an artist in Norway and the man who steals her painting. That happens in the first few minutes, so I’m not revealing much, and I won’t say more because the film benefits—like almost all movies—from a blank canvas of expectancy. But I was talking to JBFC Senior Programmer Andrew Jupin, and we both agreed that for Americans in this particular moment, it’s a bit like watching two movies. One is the film that the filmmaker made for us—the mysterious tale that unfolds from this theft—and the other is the one where you can’t help but notice the casual array of incredible social services that Norwegians simply regard as part of the air they breathe. From where we stand, in the world’s richest country, you can only crush your face against the store-front window longingly. It seems impossible that things actually work elsewhere.

Which brings me, naturally, to the second film we’re showing—Capital in the Twenty-First Century—based on economist Thomas Piketty’s bestselling book, which asks: how did we get here? And really more importantly: where can we go from here? Those are obviously big questions, and the film is a smart tour through the last four hundred years of economic history, occasionally driving down some illuminating side roads that are less familiar. I’ve invited filmmaker Astra Taylor—who did not make this film—to join us for a conversation on Thursday, May 28 at 7:30. I find her thrillingly brilliant and unconventional—a writer, an activist, a musician, and a documentary filmmaker. She makes documentaries about philosophers for chrissakes—nobody does that. You can increasingly find her provocative writings across the journalistic spectrum. She’s also thought really deeply about issues of economics and politics, and co-founded something called The Debt Collective around the immensely unspoken issue of debt, which, as millions fall suddenly into penury, may rise to meet its moment. The biblical scale of the floodwaters we’re experiencing seems like an awfully good time to open that discussion and see if we can go to some places that are perhaps less traveled. She was here last year and is just a fabulous speaker and presence, and I hope you will join us.

I’ll end on a last appeal for a film that Andrew put into rotation on our virtual screens last week: the hugely entertaining Rififi, that dazzling 1955 French thriller that is the father of all modern heist films. I was lucky enough to see it for the first time on the big screen here at the Burns 15 years ago, and have watched it twice since; its artfully staged burglary scene and wild, rhapsodic finish still thrill the heart. 

That’s it for the moment. I hope you’re all enjoying nature in this gloriously beautiful time of year, and remaining safe. There is, even through all of this, much to be thankful for. And someday, we’ll meet again at the movies.

Best,

Brian Ackerman

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NEW YORK TALENT PRESENTS: “WEAR A MASK”

WEAR A MASK–An entry in the New York State Wear A Mask Public Service Spot Contest. 92,000 votes have been cast in 3 Days. This Spot “NEW YORK TOUGH” was telecast on the Governor’s Daily Coronavirus Briefing Friday.
“Wear a Mask. Do your part. Save a Life. It May be your own.”
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ZOOM HEARING ON WHITE PLAINS SCHOOL BUDGET

WPCNR SCHOOL DAYS. From White Plains City School District. May 23, 2020:

The White Plains Board of Education will conduct a public hearing on the 2020-2021 School District Budget at a Special Meeting on Wednesday, May 27, 2020, at 7 P.M   The meeting will be videoconferenced as per the Governor’s Executive Order 202.4, COVID-19.  Zoom Link:

https://zoom.us/j/95032893523?pwd=VEpBbThRWTBCRnJEZEJkK0Z1TjFIdz09

Teacher appointments to tenure will also be on the agenda that evening.

The public vote on the budget and the election of Board Members will take place on Tuesday, June 9, 2020, by absentee ballot only.  Ballots will be sent to all qualified voters who are registered to vote.  Ballots must be returned to the District Clerk by 5 P.M. on June 9th.

            Two Board seats will be up for election, each for a three-year term of office, beginning July 1,

2020.  Incumbents Rosemarie Eller and Randy Stein are running unopposed.   In addition to the budget, the ballot includes a proposition on the use of funds from the Capital Reserves.

Information on the election and budget is available on the district’s website:

www.whiteplainspublicschools.org  or call 422-2000.

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WHITE PLAINS WEEK MAY 22 PROGRAM ON REOPENING AT WWW. WPCOMMUNITYMEDIA.ORG

JOHN BAILEY AND THE NEWS–ON OPENING UP NEW YORK
COUNTY EXECUTIVES ON WHY THEY SHOULD OPEN NOW
GEORGE LATIMER ON PLAYLAND OPENING
WHY NEW YORK CITY ISN’T MEETING THE STATE STANDARDS FOR OPENING: MASSIVE INFECTIONS IN POOR COMMUNITIES: MORE TESTING, COMMUNITY OUTREACH TO COME
SEE THE 5 FINALISTS IN THE WEAR A MASK PSA CONTEST–ALL 5

THE SPREAD OF PMSIS — THE COVID CONNECTED CONDITION AFFECTING CHILDREN AT RATE OF 10 NEW CASES A DAY

COVID-19 TESTING AT JFK AND NEWARK–SHOULD EVERY AIR TRAVELER GET A COVID TEST BEFORE LEAVING THE AIRPORTS? WHY AREN’T THEY? OR ARE THEY? SWAB THEM NOW!

LIFE SAVING TV

ON

www.wpcommunitymedia.org

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