100th WHITE PLAINS CENTENNIAL GALA TONIGHT AT WOMENS CLUB — RECALLING THE FIRST COMMON COUNCIL MEETING

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WPCNR YESTERDAY. News and Comment. May 5, 2016:

Tonight at 6, the White Plains Historical Society Centennial Ball, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of White Plains incorporation as a city in New York begains with a reception followed by a dinner. A 1910 Model T Ford will be parked out front as dignataries and citizens arrive at The C.V. Rich Mansion.

The Tuxedos and the gowns will be out in style. A Barber Shop Quartet will serenade from table to table, and Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will entertain (those provacateurs who appeared in Cotton Club, Boardwalk Empire and The Aviator). Proceeds will go to support the White Plains Rural Cemetary, the last resting place of patriots and luminaries of White Plains past.

Perhaps there will be spotlights dazzling the gathering twilight as Lexuses, Teslas and Navigators replace the roadsters of the past. We expect a lot of feather boas and Cloche hats on the beauties of today. And Bennett cocktails, too. And speeches, yes there will be speechs and Mayor Thomas Roach will be given an award.

WPCNR reminisced with the help of Renoda Hoffman’s It Happened in Old White Plains about that historical evening of December 31 to January 1 1916 in this article, let’s go back in time, shall we?

At midnight Thursday evening, Mayor Tom Roach and several members of the Common Council sang “Happy Birthday to the City of White Plains,” from the stage set up for the New Year’s Eve Spectacular. Security checks took as little as five minutes  to clear White Plains Police security for the music and festivities starting at 10 P.M.

When the White Plains “Ball” dropped at midnight, it was 100 Years to the moment when White Plains incorporated as a city, which officially took place January 1, 2016 at midnight. There is an interesting backstory as to why the first White Plains Common Council Meeting was held at midnight.

Drawing from Renoda Hoffman’s history of White Plains, It Happened In Old White Plains, I learned that the reason for the midnight meeting was interesting.

Ms. Hoffman noted that after Governor Charles E. Hughes signed the bill granting White Plains Charter as a city in April, 2015, elections were held in November, 1915 resulting in the election of Mayor Ffarrington M. Thompson with a 795 vote margin as Mayor of the city of 19,000. Councilmen elected were Joseph AllenCharles H. Dewsnap. Frederick M. Garthwait ,Frederick  C. McLaughlin John T. Rehill, and William J. Weiss.

The last meeting of the White Plains Village Trustees was held New Years Eve December 31 at 7 PM. At that meeting, it was announced the first meeting of the Common Council would be held at 10 AM New Years Day.

However when Councilmen  Allen, Weiss, and McLaughlin arrived at 2 Grand Street, the law offices of Mayor Elect Thompson , Mr. McLaughlin was informed the first meeting had been held 10 hours before at midnight as the New Year started.

Councilmen  Allen  and Weiss said they had received notice of the change in time late New Years Eve moving the 10 A.M. meeting up 8 hours to midnight. McLaughlin said he had not been informed of the time change. Allen and Weiss complained that no reason had been given for the time change at the time they received the call from the person informing them the meeting was moved up from 10 A.M. to midnight.

City residents arriving for the 10 A.M. time, were “annoyed” when informed the meeting had already taken place.

Hoffman reports that Councilman McLaughlin “believed the time had been changed because of a statement that appeared in the Daily Argus falsely reporting that he (McLaughlin) was planning to attach appointees to city positions. McLaughlin pointed out that those men had left their previous positions to accept the appointments. He had merely suggested that council members should ‘come out in the open’ and make appointments by open balloting.”

McLaughlin is quoted as saying: “I think the meeting at midnight was stupid and undignified. They made themselves ridiculous. I shall do my duty as I see it.”

With Mayor Thompson’s vote creating a quorum commissioner appointments were approved, 4-0 at the very private midnight meeting.

The Water Commissioner Edward West reported a $24,054 surplus to the city, but warned if cows and livestock were not kept from reservoir property, the new city watersupply would become polluted. He recommended fencing the entire watershed. Then swearing in of Commissioners began.

Henry Sutherland was appointed first temporary City Clerk. Miguel Hauck, Public Works Commissioner was given office space on Court Street. Finance Commissioner  Charles Fuchs was given space  at the Tod Building, where the Michaelian Office Building stands now.  John W. Calhoun was appointed Commissioner of Public Safety and installed in offices at the Grand Street firehouse, that also housed police and firemen.

The schools at that time were under the management of the city. Two women were chosen to serve on the Board of Education, Harriet M. Griffin for 3 months and Eveline Dickenson for 1 year. Other members were Richard E. Dougherty, Ambrose F. McCable, Willam X. Weed and R. Emmett Digney. Terms ranged from 1 to 4 years.

Charles Dewsnap was voted President of the Common Council.

There were 16 meetings of the Common Council that January 1916.

The total City Budget in 1916, including the school budget was $653,944.45.

The 2015-16 White Plains CITY budget  with the school budget NOT INCLUDED is $179.2 Million, and if city budget  is raised 4% will increase to over $186 Million.  The White Plains City School budget for 2015-16 is $205.8 Million and if it is raised 4% will increase to $214 Million. The total cost of running the 2015-16 city and schools is $385 Million

What were the salaries of the 1916 Staff?:

Mayor–$1,000

Councilman–$1,800

Commissioner of Public Works–$4,000

Commissioner of Public Safety–$2,500

Commissioner of Finance–$3,500

City Clerk–$2,500

City Judge–$2,000

Page — $200

At midnight New Years Eve January 1, 2016, Mayor Tom Roach and several members of the Common Council sang “Happy Birthday to the City of White Plains,” from the stage set up for the New Year’s Eve Spectacular. Security checks took as little as five minutes  to clear White Plains Police security for the music and festivities starting at 10 P.M.

When the White Plains “Ball” dropped at midnight, it was 100 Years to the moment when White Plains incorporated as a city, which officially took place January 1, 2016 at midnight. There is an interesting backstory as to why the first White Plains Common Council Meeting was held at midnight.

Drawing from Renoda Hoffman’s history of White Plains, It Happened In Old White Plains, I learned that the reason for the midnight meeting was interesting.

Ms. Hoffman noted that after Governor Charles E. Hughes signed the bill granting White Plains Charter as a city in April, 2015, elections were held in November, 1915 resulting in the election of Mayor Ffarrington M. Thompson with a 795 vote margin as Mayor of the city of 19,000. Councilmen elected were Joseph AllenCharles H. Dewsnap. Frederick M. Garthwait ,Frederick  C. McLaughlin John T. Rehill, and William J. Weiss.

The last meeting of the White Plains Village Trustees was held New Years Eve December 31 at 7 PM. At that meeting, it was announced the first meeting of the Common Council would be held at 10 AM New Years Day.

However when Councilmen  Allen, Weiss, and McLaughlin arrived at 2 Grand Street, the law offices of Mayor Elect Thompson , Mr. McLaughlin was informed the first meeting had been held 10 hours before at midnight as the New Year started.

Councilmen  Allen  and Weiss said they had received notice of the change in time late New Years Eve moving the 10 A.M. meeting up 8 hours to midnight. McLaughlin said he had not been informed of the time change. Allen and Weiss complained that no reason had been given for the time change at the time they received the call from the person informing them the meeting was moved up from 10 A.M. to midnight.

City residents arriving for the 10 A.M. time, were “annoyed” when informed the meeting had already taken place.

Hoffman reports that Councilman McLaughlin “believed the time had been changed because of a statement that appeared in the Daily Argus falsely reporting that he (McLaughlin) was planning to attach appointees to city positions. McLaughlin pointed out that those men had left their previous positions to accept the appointments. He had merely suggested that council members should ‘come out in the open’ and make appointments by open balloting.”

McLaughlin is quoted as saying: “I think the meeting at midnight was stupid and undignified. They made themselves ridiculous. I shall do my duty as I see it.”

With Mayor Thompson’s vote creating a quorum commissioner appointments were approved, 4-0 at the very private midnight meeting.

The Water Commissioner Edward West reported a $24,054 surplus to the city, but warned if cows and livestock were not kept from reservoir property, the new city watersupply would become polluted. He recommended fencing the entire watershed. Then swearing in of Commissioners began.

Henry Sutherland was appointed first temporary City Clerk. Miguel Hauck, Public Works Commissioner was given office space on Court Street. Finance Commissioner  Charles Fuchs was given space at the Tod Building, where the Michaelian Office Building stands now.  John W. Calhoun was appointed Commissioner of Public Safety and installed in offices at the Grand Street firehouse, that also housed police and firemen.

The schools at that time were under the management of the city. Two women were chosen to serve on the Board of Education, Harriet M. Griffin for 3 months and Eveline Dickenson for 1 year. Other members were Richard E. Dougherty, Ambrose F. McCable, Willam X. Weed and R. Emmett Digney. Terms ranged from 1 to 4 years.

Charles Dewsnap was voted President of the Common Council.

There were 16 meetings of the Common Council that January 1916.

The total City Budget in 1916, including the school budget was $653,944.45.

The 2015-16 White Plains CITY budget  with the school budget NOT INCLUDED is $179.2 Million, and if city budget  is raised 4% will increase to over $186 Million.  The White Plains City School budget for 2015-16 is $205.8 Million and if it is raised 4% will increase to $214 Million. The total cost of running the 2015-16 city and schools is $385 Million

What were the salaries of the 1916 Staff:

Mayor–$1,000

Councilman–$1,800

Commissioner of Public Works–$4,000

Commissioner of Public Safety–$2,500

Commissioner of Finance–$3,500

City Clerk–$2,500

City Judge–$2,000

Page — $200

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Building a Winner Town — Leaders Who Did It Tell How at Westchester County Association

WPCNR TRADEWINDS. From the Westchester County Association. May 5, 2016:

How They Did It!
Five Experts Give Their Best Advice For Transforming Westchester
Westchester County Association asked some of the most successful people from around the nation to come to Westchester: County of Tomorrow and share how they did it last Friday at The Rennaisance Hotel– how they helped transform their regional economy.
Here’s how they did it:
 
MAJOR TAKEAWAYS | WESTCHESTER: COUNTY OF TOMORROW
Anticipate Millennials’ Infrastructure Needs!
NAME: Joan McDonald
TITLE: Former Commissioner, NYS DOT
FROM: Mahopac, NY
JM: In a recent survey of American mayors, fixing America’s failing infrastructure should be the top priority for the next U.S. president. Millennials will have different infrastructure needs than current generations.
Joan McDonald
Show Investors a Density of Entrepreneurs
NAME: Jason Wieden
TITLE: CEO, HQ Raleigh/Charlotte
FROM: Raleigh, NC
JW: Communities need to be entrepreneur-led. We convened 350 entrepreneurs with opposing viewpoints and assembled a blueprint for entrepreneurship. We created density of community which attracted VC funding. We developed “sexy space” to attract entrepreneurs so they could work and bump into each other, fostering collaboration.
Jason Widen
 
Build the Human Infrastructure, Talent
NAME: Susan Dawson
TITLE: President E3 Consulting
FROM: Austin, TX
SD: Build your human infrastructure. Talent is key for cities. We used data to tell a story of how reducing K-12 absences and growing STEM education was worth $540 Million to Central Texas. Aggregate the data to galvanize community action.
Susan Dawson
Focus on Business Climate, Not Sectors
 
NAME: Seth Pinsky
TITLE: Former Bloomberg NYC Economic Development Corp. President; EVP, RXR Realty
FROM: Brooklyn, NY
SP: Our goal was to make New York the 21st century capitol of innovation. We focused on quality of life as an economic development issue, investing in lowering crime, better education, and more amenities. We looked at data to find patterns which led to a need for R&D (Governor’s Island campus development). Government is bad a picking winners and losers, so we focused on building a better business climate rather than a particular sector. We also avoided offering incentives to attract companies with 100 employees, as you’ll “race to the bottom” on cost.
Work is Changing. Invest in Fiber Networks
 
NAME: Andy Berke
TITLE: Mayor, City of Chattanooga
FROM: Chattanooga, TN
AB: Don’t hold on to your past for too long. We rolled out a municipally-owned 10 GIG fiber network to make Chattanooga America’s most wired city. This action sparked an innovation district downtown with arts and culture that is walkable. Downtown’s population will double by next year. The entire community is involved.
Berke DAwson

 

 

 

 

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County Offers Minnows to Chew Up Mosquitos

 

MINNOWS

WPCNR HEALTH NEWS. From County Legislator Benjamin Boykin (5th District) May 4, 2016:

To eliminate mosquito breeding sites and prevent the spread of West Nile Virus and other mosquito-borne diseases, the Westchester County Health Department will offer free minnows, mosquito dunks and “Keep Healthy and Bug Off” brochures to residents on six Mosquito Control Days this month.
Residents with ornamental ponds should add the fathead minnows to the water to keep it from becoming a mosquito breeding site. The dunks serve the same purpose in birdbaths, rain barrels and unused pools.
Health Department staff will be available to answer questions and give out “Keep Healthy and Bug Off” brochures, which offer advice on how residents can prevent mosquito bites and eliminate standing water around their homes to keep mosquitoes from breeding nearby.
Residents with ponds who want the minnows should bring a bucket or pail to 2 Loop Road at the Westchester County Airport. The building is the first right from the airport access road. Minnows will be distributed in watertight plastic bags, and residents should plan to bring them straight home and release them into ponds with at least eight inches of water.
  • Wednesday – Friday, May 4-6, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Thursday – Friday, May 19-20, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Saturday, May 21, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
To eliminate breeding sites, the health department will begin to apply larvicide to catch basins that hold standing water but are clear of debris starting Monday, May 9th.
Larvaciding teams will evaluate and treat as needed, all catch basins on county and municipal roads throughout the county over the next few months.
To help prevent mosquitoes from breeding, residents should eliminate standing water from around their properties, especially after it rains.  Large areas of standing water on public property that cannot easily be removed should be reported to the Health Department by calling (914) 813-5000.
To learn more about mosquito prevention, visit the Health Department’s website at www.westchestergov.com/health.
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Final Public Hearing on City School Budget Monday

PUBLIC HEARING ON SCHOOL BUDGET

The final Public Hearing and Presentation on the Superintendent’s Proposed $208,750,000 2016-17 Budget for the White Plains City School District will be held on Monday, May 9, 2016, at 7:30 P.M. at Education House, 5 Homeside Lane.

The public vote on the budget, a capital project proposition and re-election of two School Board members, Sheryl Brady and Charles  Norris, (the only candidates to file petitions to run), will take place on Tuesday, May 17th, from Noon to 9 P.M. at six voting locations.

The proposition on the ballot will include establishing a $25,000,000 reserve and reads thus:

“Shall the proposition set forth in the notice of this meeting authorizing the establishment of a capital reserve fund with an ultimate amount of $25,000,000, a term of 10 years, and annual appropriation of available fund balance and other legally available funds to such Reserve Fund, be approved?”

 

Please note:  due to the closing of Fire Station #5, the new polling place in that area will be the Battle Hill Community Room.

Information on the Budget is available on the district’s website, www.whiteplainspublicschools.org  or in each school building.

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COUNTY LEGISLATOR BENJAMIN BOYKIN SUPPLIES DETAILS OF THE PLAYLAND — STANDARD AMUSEMENTS AGREEMENT

WPCNR COUNTY CLARION-LEDGER. SPECIAL TO WPCNR FROM County Legislator Benjamin Boykin, District 5, May 3, 2016:

On Monday, May 2, 2016, the Board of Legislators approved a revised agreement (“agreement”) between Westchester County (“the County”) and Standard Amusements, LLC. (“Standard”) by a vote of 13 to 4. In addition, the Board of Legislators approved spending $33.208 million in capital investments for Playland. I voted to approve the agreement and the capital spending.

Working with my Democratic colleagues, I restructured the agreement to save taxpayers millions of dollars by ensuring that Standard does not double count their management investment. I also had provisions included in the agreement to clarify that rides added to Playland by Standard could not be removed.  These changes will permit the County to begin to share in net profits sooner and will reduce the financial impact on our taxpayers.

The key points of the agreement include:

  • Standard will manage Playland for a term of 30 years
  • Standard will make payments to the County of $2.25 million by June 15, 2016 of which $500,000 is non-refundable and $1.5 million will be placed in a special reserve account by the County, of which a portion may revert to Standard if certain conditions are not met
  • Standard will invest $5.0 million in Playland prior to June 1, 2017
  • Standard will make a management investment of at least $27.75 million and up to $32.75 million within five years
  • Standard will continue to make additional capital investments in Playland over the 30 year term
  • The County will make capital investments of at least $33.208 million, which were approved on May 2
  • Standard will continue to co-manage Playland with the County and will take over full management in either 2017 or 2018 depending upon when the County has made at least 50% of its required capital investments which were approved by the Board on May 2
  • Standard will pay the County an annual Management Fee of $300,000 which will increase by at least 2% per year
  • In addition to the annual Management Fee, the County will share in net profits (after Standard has recouped its management investment) starting at 8% and growing to 12% over the term of the agreement
  • Standard will pay the County rent for various booths and other items at Playland

When Standard takes over full management of Playland, the County will be reimbursed for 100% of salaries and overtime costs plus 30% of salaries for fringe benefits for County employees that will continue to work at Playland for Standard.  After two years, Standard will reimburse the County for 100% of County employees’ costs for salaries and overtime and 100% of fringe benefits. County employees who will no longer work at Playland will be provided other jobs within the County at the same pay, pay grade and benefits. In addition, Standard will reimburse the County for police and park ranger services.

Playland will continue to provide summer employment opportunities for many youth in Westchester.

The Board of Legislators will decide to either replace or close the Playland pool by July 31, 2016. Standard will manage this area once the County has made its decision.

While not perfect, this agreement and Board approved capital spending will result in much needed investment in Playland by the County and Standard of at least $61 million. Taxpayers will not have to pay directly for $27.75 million of management investment that will be put up by Standard.  Instead, the operating cash flow from Playland will be used by Standard to recoup this investment.

The $33.208 million capital investment by the County will cost the taxpayers approximately $2.6 million per year in principal and interest payments on the new debt to finance the County’s capital expenditures. These are needed capital investments in Playland that have been deferred by the County and would have been required regardless of an agreement. This $2.6 million will be partially offset by payments from Standard to the County for the annual Management Fee and net profits share.

Under this public/private deal, the County will continue to own Playland and will have considerable leverage over Standard. Playland will receive new rides and upgrades to the Park’s infrastructure, resulting in an updated and revitalized park for Westchester. Over time, the County will reap financial benefits and at the end of the term of the agreement, the County will continue to own Playland.  Our historical Playland will be revitalized for us and future generations to enjoy.

Playland is opening on May 7 for the 2016 season. I am working to improve the customer experience for everyone with this agreement between Standard and the County. While neither party got all that they wanted, I believe that we negotiated a better situation for our taxpayers while enhancing this historical jewel.

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STANDARD AMUSEMENTS WILL RUN PLAYLAND FOR 30 YEARS..JOINTLY THIS YEAR…AND COUNTY AGREES TO FINANCE $33 MILLION OF IMPROVEMENTS REQUESTED BY STANDARD. COUNTY CUT OF PROFITS REMAINS SAME AS PREVIOUS AGREEMENT

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WPCNR COUNTY CLARION-LEDGER. From the Westchester County Department of Communications and the Democratic Caucus May 2, 2016 (Edited) UPDATED (ITALICS) May 3, 2016:

Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino’s plan to ensure the financial future of the 1928 vintage amusement park Playland (shown above) through a public-private partnership with Standard Amusements was approved Monday night by the Board of Legislators by a vote of 13-4.

The management agreement was passed separately from individual bonds that authorized funding for several capital projects at Playland including a new fire suppression system, the North Boardwalk and various new rides and attractions.

The approval means that New York-based Standard Amusements will make a $30 million private investment in return for the right to operate the iconic park in Rye.

Standard Amusement’s $30 million investment will go toward revitalizing Playland with new rides and attractions, as well as upgrading food choices, picnic areas, and restaurants and renovating grounds and buildings. Standard Amusements will pay the county $2,250,000 up front; invest $27,750,000 million of its money within five years into refurbishing the park; and make annual payments to the county starting at $300,000 and escalating 2% a year. Once Standard Amusements has recouped its initial investment, the county will participate in a sliding-scale profit sharing agreement.

In return, Standard Amusements will have a management agreement with the county to run the park for 30 years. For its part, the county has agreed  to fund 11 capital projects to rehabilitate the infrastructure at Playland, costing $33 million, including rides, gaming and concession improvements, as well as shoreline rehabilitation.

(Editor’s Note: County Legislator Benjamin Boykin in a detailed analysis of the agreement, wrote the new debt service per year that the county will assume is $2.5 Million, which WPCNR is trying to confirm is added to the $3 Million in debt service the county is currently paying on previous Playland debt. It is unclear if the county is going to consolidate the previous debt service.

In his analysis of the agreement, Mr. Boykin wrote the new debt service would be partially offset by the $300,000 management fee which begins immediately, how much of the total debt service will be offset is not clear.}

“We started with a blank piece of paper for how to save Playland six years ago,” Astorino said. “Now we are taking a historic step forward.  The capital, the operator and the vision are in place to protect both taxpayers and the Dragon Coaster for years to come.”

Astorino said the effort to save Playland was a team effort, and he thanked BOL Chairman Michael Kaplowitz for keeping the deal on track, the members of the BOL who supported the initiative, and Nicholas Singer, a partner of Standard Amusements, for his patience and persistence for sticking with the county until a deal could be successfully concluded.

Singer, a successful investor and native of Westchester, said the deal is designed to preserve the special character of Playland that he remembers as a child.

“To have the opportunity to take a place that meant so much to me throughout my childhood and help restore it to a condition that ensures generations of children to come will be able to enjoy it as I did, is really a dream come true,” Singer said. “I cannot be more thankful to County Executive Astorino and the Westchester Board of Legislators for their vote of confidence and their partnership throughout this process. This is a wonderful day for Westchester.”

Playland opens on Saturday, May 7, at 11:30 a.m., for its 88th season.

DEMOCRAT CAUCUS TROUBLED…

Legislator Catherine Parker (D-Rye), joined by Majority Leader Catherine Borgia (D-Ossining), Legislator Alfreda Williams (D-Greenburgh) and Legislator Ken Jenkins (D-Yonkers), voted against the agreement but in favor of separate bond acts, which authorize the largest investment in Playland since it was built. 

Legislator Catherine Parker, who represents the Sound Shore communities including Playland stated, “I believe this deal has gone backwards from the one that was crafted previously.  We are spending more money than we were in the last deal and the private operator is reaping more of the benefits of our investment than they were in the last deal.  I believe turning over the keys to one of our county’s most valuable assets without any avenue of accountability is a mistake that will cost us in the long run.  So many county residents have been involved in the process by telling us that this park has been starved for years and they want to see a change.  We’re happy that the public had another opportunity to tell the County Executive that this asset cannot function without the proper investment like he has avoided for years.  I believe the bonds we’ve passed tonight are a strong step in the direction of saving Playland”

Legislator Borgia added, “I have been a supporter of Standard Amusements’ vision for Playland from the beginning of this process several years ago when the County Executive initially selected Sustainable Playland as the operator.  With input from many of our Legislators and members of the public at that time, it ultimately became clear that the County Executive had failed to select a financially viable entity and was unaware of what was required to manage this park successfully.  The County Executive’s track record of starving Playland and failing to negotiate economically beneficial deals for taxpayers is the greatest reason for my concern over this deal despite Standard’s willingness to work with all of the Stakeholders involved.  At this time, I do not believe the county has represented its taxpayers as well as Standard has represented its investors.

Legislator Lyndon Williams (D-Mt. Vernon) added, “Playland is the single largest employer of summer youth in Westchester County.  I wanted to ensure that summer jobs for our young people are protected and that this historic amusement park is modernized and upgraded with new rides and entertainment for families and young people for generations to come.”

“This deal is not perfect but I do believe that paired with the bonds we passed tonight, we have made strides toward saving Playland,” stated Legislator MaryJane Shimsky (D-Hastings-on-Hudson), who Chairs the BoL Infrastructure Committee and oversaw large portions of the negotiation process. “The County Executive’s longtime reluctance to make needed capital investment in Playland is the reason we need a public-private partnership.  By contractually obligating the County Executive to make these investments, I believe we have given Playland the opportunity to provide enjoyment to families for many years to come.”

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ARCHBISHOP STEPINAC TAPS 5 FOR HALL OF FAME

Archbishop Stepinac High School will hold a Hall of Fame Reception and Induction ceremony at 6:30 PM, Thursday May 5 at the school, 950 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains.

The six inductees will join Stepinac’s Honor Roll begun in 1994 that recognizes distinguished alumni, faculty, groups or families for their significant contributions to the success of the school.

They are:

Art Ciocca (Class of ’55), distinguished alumnus and long-time benefactor and Chairman Emeritus of The Wine Group, the world’s third largest wine product by group.

Michael Frey (Class of ’84), the Eastchester Police Officer who was killed in the line of duty 20 years ago. His family will be on hand for Stepinac’s moving tribute to Frey’s young life. Frey is the 8th Stepinac alumnus to be inducted  posthumously into the Hall of Fame.

Kevin Keane (Class of ’74), distinguished alumnus and long-time benefactor of his alma mater, Chairman of Stepinac’s Board of Trustees and Managing Partner of PFK O’Connor Davies, ranked by “Inside Pubic Accounting” as one of the nation’s top accounting and advisory firms.

Michael O’Donnell, Stepinac Athletic Director and Head Varsity Football Coach for more than 35 years and winning coach of two consecutive CHSFL Titles and the 2015 NY State Catholic Football Championship

Deborah and Edward Robinson (Class of ’58), distinguished alumnus and benefactors as Trustees of the Edward & Deborah Robinson Scholarship. Edward is retired President and COO of Avon Products, Inc., the well-known, worldwide manufacturer of beauty and related products.  .

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WHITE PLAINS WEEK ON DETAILS OF SUSTAINABLE WESTCHESTER CONTRACT WITH CON ED, PLUS THE KENSICO KILLING, GANNETT ACQUISITIONS, MORE ON THE INTERNET NOW www.whiteplainsweek.com

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THE GUARDIANS– WATCHERS ON THE RHINE–FOR 15 YEARS — JIM BENEROFE AND JOHN BAILEY AND PETER KATZ –THE WHITE PLAINS WEEK NEWS TEAM COUNTED ON FOR TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH WESTCHESTER’S MOST RELEVANT NEWS PROGRAM

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THE FRIDAY APRIL 29 SHOW IS ON

www.whiteplainsweek.com

AND YOUTUBE AT

now

ON

THE INTRIGUING DETAILS OF THE WHITE PLAINS SUSTAINABLE WESTCHESTER PROGRAM 

SOLAR PANELS PLANNED FOR 4 WHITE PLAINS CITY OWNED SITES AND THROUGHOUT 20 MUNICIPALITIES.

GANNETT TO ACQUIRE LOS ANGELES, CHICAGO BALTIMORE DETROIT KINGPIN NEWSPAPERS

THE SAD TRUTH ABOUT WHAT THE KENSICO AVE KILLING SAYS

AND MORE

 

 

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Shakespeare Play Props Lead to WPHS Lockdown. Youth was bringing in “Sharp Objects” for Play

WPCNR SCHOOL DAYS. From the City School District. April 29, 2016:

THIS MORNING WHITE PLAINS HIGH SCHOOL WENT ON LOCKDOWN, AFTER TWO STUDENTS OBSERVED A BOY BRING “SHARP OBJECTS” INTO THE SCHOOL, MICHELE SCHOENFELD, CLERK TO THE SCHOOL DISTRICT, TOLD WPCNR NEWS at 8:45 A.M. THIS MORNING,

“The two girls notified administrators. It turned out the boy was bringing in props for a  Shakespeare PLAY. It was very observant of the girls.”

The incident was found not to be a threat.

 

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Kickball Tournament Friday Night

City of White Plains Recreation and Parks Department
Boys and Girls
 Grades 5-8th 
Friday April 29
7-9:30PM
Gillie Park Field
(85 Gedney Way)
Fee: $8
** Children must have waiver signed by Parent or Guardian**
TEEN NIGHT
KICKBALL TOURNAMENT
Come test your skills at kickball, while having fun with your friends. Pick your own teams or you will be placed on a team when you arrive. A movie will be showing while you wait to play, with drinks and popcorn!

All equipment is provided.

For any further info, please call 914-422-1336
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