TONIGHT AT 8: AARON WOODEN, WHITE PLAINS COMPUTER TROUBLESHOOTER FOR 15 YEARS ON ONLINE COMPUTER SECURITY FOR HOME AND BUSINESS. ON CHANNEL 45 FIOS COUNTYWIDE AND CHANNEL 76 ATICE-CABLEVISION

JOHN BAILEY AND JIM BENEROFE ON

PEOPLE TO BE HEARD

INTERVIEW

IMG_0197

AARON WOODIN 

OF PC VENTURES

WP_20170511_20_07_23_Pro

THE “GO-TO-GUY” WHEN YOUR COMPUTER GOES AWRY

FOR 15 YEARS

AARON TALKS ABOUT

COMPUTER SECURITY TODAY

SIGNS YOUR COMPUTER NEEDS REPLACING.

SCAMS TODAY

UPGRADES WHEN TO DO THEM, WHETHER OR NOT YOU NEED TO

AND MORE

TONIGHT AT 8 ON VERIZON FIOS CHANNEL 45 COUNTYWIDE

AND

IN WHITE PLAINS ON ALTICE CABLEVISION CHANNEL 76

AND

www.wpcommunitymedia.org

Posted in Uncategorized

48 YEARS AGO TODAY. MEN WALKED ON THE MOON. REMEMBERING THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY

This column originally appeared on WPCNR on February 1, 2003, and celebrates the Dreamers, the Achievers, the High and the Mighty:

The Space Blazers:

 The Apollo 11 Crew: Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins,  Buzz Aldrin, Jr. Mr. Armstrong set foot on the moon 48 years ago on July 20.(NASA Photo)

One of the papers I receive at WPCNR White Plains News Headquarters, White Plains, New York, USA did not tell me this was the 48th  anniversary of the day when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon.

The exact hour  was  20:11 GMT (Greenwich Mean Time). That was the culmination of the last great American achievement  – the personal computer and the internet were to come as the next great American achievement conquering space — when Apollo 11 with Armstrong in command, with astronauts Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. blasted off to the stars  for real becoming the Flash Gordons, Buck Rogerses, Tom Corbetts and Captain Videos for all-time.

Their mission was a success.

But there have been the tragedies associated with striving for the stars and being the best, achieving the best, working for the good. Those are the persons who keep the dreams alive by their deaths and personal sacrifice. I wrote the following after the explosion of the Columbia Space Shuttle upon reentry after 19 days in space in January 2003.

Saturday’s fatal Columbia Space Shuttle accident killing all 7 astronauts aboard when the historic spacecraft broke up over East Texas at daybreak Saturday morning begins a period of national mourning. 
The expected media speculations have started, guessing at the cause of the reentry that went bizarrely, awfully wrong.
The truth is the civilized world takes absolute scientific miracles for granted. We do not appreciate the courage and skills of the men and women creating the future.
Those of us with cell phones, internet connections, high-speed trains, satellite communications and entertainment (all products made possible by the space program), do not realize the magnitude of daring achievements that you and I have come to accept to be executed like clockwork.
I first learned of Columbia’s fate late Saturday afternoon when my wife mentioned that instead of sports programming being videotaped on our television, there was coverage of a live NASA event on ABC.
(Incredibly, the radio station I had been listening to on the way from a sports clinic had not reported any hint of the accident. That station was Z-100, the most listened-to station in the New York metropolitan area. America Online also on their first up page did not mention the missing craft as of midday. That kind of communications misjudgment is sad.)
As I watched the close of Mr. Jennings’ coverage at about 3 PM, he signed off with no recap, no names of astronauts, and some parting words about what he thought was the cause of the disaster.
I’ll say what he should have said.
Columbia’s seven astronauts who died — we know their names: they were

 

Columbus, Magellan, Cook, Lewis, Clark, the Wrights, Lindbergh, De Laroche, Earhart, Markham, Gruber, Chaffee, Grissom, White, Gargarin, Komarov, the Challenger Crew, the crew of Soyuz 11. They are a handful of the hundreds of brave men and women who went into the unknown.

 

Appollo 11′s Crew turned the dreams of the 1950s visualized in television shows like Tom Corbett, Space Cadet (above, Astro, Roger and Tom) and Captain Video, “The Master of Science” below  into reality.

America’s Spacemen and the explorers before them are the people who trust in their ability and their vessel to expand the world’s horizons, to know the unknown, whose legacies build a better world. Whose deeds inspire and achievements are the catalysts for achievement to come.


From Captain Cook’s fragile vessel which sailed the Pacific, to the marvel that was the Columbia, the captains courageous who sailed the Roaring 40s, blazed the Oregon Trail, discovered how to fly, and flew the oceans, journeyed to the stars, knew the risks they were taking. 


The media  trivializes their courage, their skills, and the difficulty of what they did and wanted to do, to concentrate on the causes of their failure, as if knowing the cause will make their loss acceptable.

The Magnificent Seven


I do not know Columbia’s Magnificent Seven. I just see their smiling faces in their photograph, and I regret the loss of every one. They had achievement on their faces, pride in their demeanor. Their eyes shown with the glow of being alive and striving to do the great things they set out to do.


Civilization has been created because of people like the crew of the Columbia’s Magnificent Seven, not the incompetence we see demonstrated daily today where technology is concerned.


The Columbia itself had flown 26 missions since launching in 1981. It was guided and outfitted with the best 2003 communications and equipment had to offer.

Not like Captain James Cook’s bark, Endeavour, a 100-foot ship powered by sail that conquered the “space” of his time, the Pacific Ocean. It was the Columbia’s Magnificent Seven’s Endeavour. They were tracked, they were backed up, but they perhaps more than anyone here on the ground knew the high dangers of the shuttle mission.


Liftoff, as their predecessors, The Challenger crew fell victim to, is fraught with risk. Reentry, which needs to be negotiated at precisely the right angle of attack, is equally risky. Soyuz 11’s spacecrew of Dobrovolskiy, Volkov, and Patsayev died in 1971 on reentry, when the Russian cosmonauts took too long to descend.


No guarantees in real life. Machines sometimes run out of miracles.

The magnificence of the explorers’ sacrifice and dedication, is that they accept the risk of “the endeavor.”


They accept the challenge, bear it alone, seizing challenge with an indomitable spirit and confidence, facing death when it comes with the satisfaction that they made the effort, and I suspect analyzing, coping, trying to fix it until the end, the very end.

They never give up.


Columbia’s Magnificent Seven, after 16 days in space, are gone now. My sorrow is with their families who will miss these Magnificent Seven, and who know in their hearts that they died trying to reach the pinnacle of their aspirations.


They are only human.


They tried their best, achieved their best, and experienced what they longed to experience. They dared to live the great adventure.


Not all of us have the courage to follow our longed-for adventures and make them real. You can watch movies that attempt to give that experience by transference. That’s why, I believe, you and I take it so personally when we lose heroic personalities of our time. We wonder what they are like. We glorify them, rightly so.

Follow Me! They Say.


I wonder how those Magnificent Seven felt, how satisfying it must have been, to be at your best, doing what you love, coping with the risks.I envy them that.

The Columbia Crew is the Miracle.

In reality it is not machines that conquer, it is the intrepid personalities, each unique, each contributing, who perform the miracles with God’s help. That they fall short is an example to us, not to take ourselves, our fates, or our existences for granted.


This is true of the everyday people we take for granted: the firefighter, the policeman, the train engineer, the airline pilot, the construction worker. All are highly trained disciplined workers, executing precise tasks for which the non-expert has no feel or understanding . What makes for the desire to achieve? What is out there or up there that leads them on?

The Feel of the Unknown


I took Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s biographical adventure diary, Listen! The Wind down from the bookshelf.

She was the young bride of the aviator-pioneer, Charles Lindbergh. She navigated for him in his aircraft, and ran his radio communications on his many exploratory flights around the world.

In a passage she describes a night flight over the ocean, in which she was operating the radio for her husband Charles, who was at the controls. Mrs. Lindbergh is describing the feelings she has as she tries to tune in the South American coast at sea in the dark of night in 1933, 84 years ago.

The feeling, the courage of the adventurer, the explorer has not changed. This is great:


“Night was the hardest. It would be all right once it was day. I kept saying…We began to hit clouds. I could tell without looking up, for the plane bumped slightly from time to time, first one wing down and then the other. And the moon blackened out for short periods.

Then for longer periods. I could not see to write my messages. I stiffened, dimly sensing fear – the old fear of bad weather – and looked out. We were flying under clouds. I could still find a kind of horizon, a difference in shading where the water met the clouds. That was all. But it seemed to be getting darker.

Storms? Were those clouds or was it the sky? We had lost the water. We were flying blind. I turned off the light quickly (to give my husband a little more vision), and sat waiting, tense, peering through the night. Now we were out again. There were holes through which one could see the dark sky. It was all right, I felt, as long as there were holes.


More blind flying. This is it, I thought is what people forget. This is what it means to fly across the ocean, blind and at night. But day is coming. It ought to be day before long… Daybreak! What a miracle. I didn’t see any sign of day and yet it must be lighter. The clouds were distinguishing themselves more and more from water and sea.
Daybreak—thank God—as if we had been living in eternal night—as if this were the first sun that ever rose out of the sea.

Note: This column originally appeared February 1, 2003 on WPCNR.

Posted in Uncategorized

WESTCHESTER INSTITUTE FOR HUMAN DEVELOPMENT TO DELIVER DENTAL SERVICES TO DISABLED BY NEW VAN. UNIQUE CONCEPT!

 

WPCNR HEALTH DEVELOPMENTS. From the Westchester Institute for Human Development. July 19, 2017:

The Westchester Institute for Human Development, one of 67 university-affiliated centers in the nation dedicated to improving the lives of people with disabilities through education, service, and research, announced today it was awarded a $376,826 grant from the Statewide Health Care Facility Transformation Program to replace a van which brings dental services directly to people with developmental disabilities.

“The Westchester Institute for Human Development is thrilled to have received this grant to replace our nearly-obsolete mobile dental clinic which serves individuals with severe disabilities who have significant barriers to proper and regular access to dental care.

By replacing our aged mobile dental clinic, we hope to be able to serve up to 30 more individuals per week, provide more consistent and reliable scheduling of visits, and better meet the complex dental care needs of this population,” said Dr. Susan Fox, President and CEO of WIHD.

WIHD’s Dental Van regularly visits community services agencies throughout the Hudson Valley Region and provides appointments on-site which decreases not only patient transportation costs but also costs associated with avoidable poorer health outcomes.

In addition to the Dental Van, WIHD’s Dental Center on the Valhalla campus offers a complete range of specialized dental services and ongoing care for people with disabilities. Services are delivered in a state-of-the-art dental suite at WIHD.

With four operatories, the WIHD Dental Department is able to accommodate the growing needs of individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD).

Westchester Medical Center is also available to meet the needs of WIHD patients that require general anesthesia. Few hospitals in the state provide this much-needed service.

This is the second major grant received by WIHD in the past few weeks. Earlier this month, WIHD received a federal grant of $547,000 for medical research, training and education of human services professionals, and innovative program development.

 Westchester Institute for Human Development

The Westchester Institute for Human Development is one of 67 university-affiliated centers dedicated to improving the lives of people with disabilities through education, service, and research. The Institute works to advance policies and practices that ensure the health and self-determination among people of all ages with developmental disabilities, and the safety and well-being of vulnerable children. For over 40 years, WIHD has been a key regional resource supporting children and adults with disabilities including autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, neurological and cognitive disabilities, hearing and vision problems, and speech/language delays. WIHD’s services, which often follow a person throughout his or her lifespan, include comprehensive dental and adult medical care programs, service coordination and planning, education and support services. For more information, go to www.wihd.org.

Posted in Uncategorized

HUD DISPUTE OVER WESTCHESTER ZONING RESOLVED. RIGHT TO HOME RULE PRESERVED

AIPresser

County Executive Robert P. Astorino stands with leaders in some of the affected communities in the 7 year dispute with HUD. Astorino announced today the HUD suit was at last resolved Friday when HUD accepted the county zoning analysis in dispute. Leaders from left, Rye Brook Mayor Paul Rosenberg, Eastchester Town Supervisor Anthony Colavita, North Salem Town Supervisor Warren Lucas and Mamaroneck Town Supervisor Nancy Seligson.

WPCNR COUNTY-CLARION-LEDGER. From the Westchester County Department of Communications. (Edited) July 18, 2017.

The Department of Housing and Urban Development last Friday accepted Westchester’s analysis that did not find any exclusionary zoning in the county  after seven years of litigation, and 10 rejections of Westchester’s findings.

According to the news release: “Resolution of the zoning issue protects home rule with respect to local land use decisions and overcomes the county’s last major hurdle under the settlement, which was signed by former County Executive Andrew Spano and approved by the Board of Legislators in 2009.”

“This is vindication for Westchester County and our local municipalities and a victory won on facts and principles,” said Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino. “From the beginning, my administration has been committed to meeting the county’s obligations under the settlement. But we also said that we were not going to be bullied by HUD into doing things that were not in the settlement. HUD had no reason to intrude into legitimate local zoning, and we stood firm on that. In the end, we were able to successfully defend the constitutional principle of home rule and meet the requirements of the settlement. It wasn’t easy, but everyone in Westchester can be very proud of the outcome.”

In December, the county met the settlement’s primary benchmark of having financing and building permits in place for 750 units of affordable housing in 31 mostly white communities. In fact, the county exceeded the goal with 799 units and has another 100 units in the pipeline.

With the AI approved and the benchmark on units met, the only outstanding item – one which the court has labeled “peripheral” – is for the county to complete its outreach campaign on the benefits of diversity and affordable housing.

Called “One Community,” the campaign, which is underway and scheduled to run throughout the year, includes print, radio, cable television and social media advertisements. To date, the county has spent more than $1 million on marketing and outreach, well above the settlement’s $400,000 requirement.

When HUD rejected the 10th AI submission last spring, the county asked the HUD-approved consulting firm, VHB ,that had prepared the 10th AI submission to comment.  VHB found:

“Westchester County has been very clear and consistent in stating that there are concentrations of Black/African-American populations as well as concentrations of Hispanic populations, and, in fact, there are concentrations of White populations. Based on VHB’s detailed analysis of countywide demographics and zoning, VHB finds and concludes that zoning is not the cause of such demographic concentrations. This very issue seems to be the singular outstanding issue on which HUD and Westchester disagree. It is, however, the preparer of the AI that must make reasonable conclusions based on a hard analysis of all available data. This is exactly what VHB did in its zoning analysis. It is not reasonable for HUD to insist on its own universal conclusions regardless of all the data and analysis conducted by numerous third party zoning and land use consultants and educational institutions.”

HUD’s position softened after VHB’s comment, resulting in an AI on July 13th that was essentially the same as VHB’s previous version and acceptable to all parties.

The 7-year dispute was resolved thusly: On Friday HUD withdrew its previous demands and in a one paragraph letter, Jay Golden, the agency’s regional administrator of the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, said the county’s AI has “been deemed acceptable.”

It is extremely important to note two additional points. The methodology followed by the county and VHB for conducting the AI was approved by HUD. And as Congress reviews its national policies for Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing, it should look carefully at the experience in Westchester.

Astorino thanked VHB, the county’s staff, particularly the Law and Planning Departments, and the 31 settlement communities for all their efforts and cooperation in meeting the goals of the settlement.

“Our success has resulted from two key factors,” Astorino said. “First, proof that our zoning isn’t exclusionary is the indisputable fact that the units are being built under current local zoning. Second, we worked closely with our communities. One lawsuit could have derailed everything, so our focus was always on cooperation, not litigation.”

Astorino said the next goal was to wrap up the settlement and that included bringing the expense of paying for the federal monitor assigned to the case to an end. The current monitor, Stephen C. Robinson, is a former federal judge and partner in the New York City law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. He bills at a rate of $675 an hour, but unlike the previous monitor his fees are not capped at $175,000 a year.

“Given our success and where we are now, there is just no need for the monitor anymore, nor justification for the expense,” said Astorino.

The county has spent about $30 million more than the $51.6 million required under the terms of the settlement. In addition, the county has leveraged more than $172 million in other public funding, putting total subsidies at $233 million and the average taxpayer subsidy per settlement unit at approximately $290,000.

As a comparison, the 2016 median sale price in Westchester is $640,000 for a single family home, $357,750 for a condominium and $153,000 for a co-op, according to the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors.

Astorino said the cost of the units was not surprising since they were built in some of the most expensive places in Westchester, as required by the settlement. In fact, some sites were turned down because they were simply too expensive. “Affordable housing is not immune to high taxes and real estate prices,” Astorino said.

About 425 of the settlement units are already occupied, with roughly one third as homeownership and two-thirds as rentals. Data from the applications show 35 percent of the households applying for the county’s units identified as white, 35 percent as African-American, 3 percent as Asian, 8 percent as multi-racial and 29 percent as Hispanic.

The 31 settlement communities were selected on the basis of the 2000 Census as having lower African-American and Hispanic populations than the county average. Notably, between 2000 and 2010, prior to the implementation of the settlement, the African-American and Hispanic populations of those 31 communities increased 56 percent as a result of natural market forces.

In contrast, the settlement’s 750 units, assuming three people per unit, would at most increase Hispanic and African-American representation in the 31 communities by 5 percent.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Councilwoman Milagros Lecuona Accepts Republican and Conservatiive Party Nominations to Run For Mayor.

 

milagros

COUNCILWOMAN MILAGROS LECUONA AT A NEWS CONFERENCE THIS SPRING. SHE HAS ACCEPTED THE REPUBLICAN AND CONSERVATIVE NOMINATIONS FOR MAYOR WHICH IF NOT CHALLENGED GUARANTEES HER TWO LINES ON THE NOVEMBER MAYORAL BALLOT.

 

Councilwoman Milagros Lecuona told WPCNR Monday afternoon that she has accepted the Republican Party nomination for Mayor and the Conservative Party nomination. The Republican Party nominated Lecouna as its Mayoral choice last week, according to Brian Maloney, White Plains Republican Party Chair.  Lecuona said she had turned in her “Certificate of Acceptance” to the Board of Elections Monday morning.

Allan Goldman, a Democratic candidate for Common Council contending in the Democratic Party Primary September 12, was also nominated by the Republican Party to run for a Council Seat.

Lecuona said she had already filed her “Certificate of Acceptance” of the Republican nomination with the Board of Elections. The Certificate is a document that candidates not being a member of party nominating must file to accept the nomination.

The Republican Party also nominated Cass V Cibeli to run for Common Council and a third council candidate that they have not officially announced yet.

Lecuona commented that she accepted the Republican and Conservative nomination for Mayor because “People want change and I am the change.”

The acceptance by Lecuona guarantees her a place on the November ballot for Mayor, should she fail to defeat incumbent Mayor Thomas Roach in the Democratic primary September 12.

This morning, Mayor Roach issued a news release, calling for Lecuona to withdraw from the Democratic primary because she was no longer “a progressive” by accepting the Republican nomination.

Lecuona, firing back this afternoon, issued a statement saying  Mr. Roach had no trouble accepted the Republican and Conservative lines in the past:

“Tom Roach’s campaign’s hypocritical call for my withdrawal from the Democratic Primary is just one more example of his rigid, unchanging ideals. In 2009, when he ran for Common Council he took the GOP and the Conservative Party Nominations. Now that all parties in White Plains are calling for change, my opponent’s opinions have changed. The people of White Plains are tired of Tom Roach’s obstinate views, and are coming from all political parties to demand more. I am honored to be supported by residents across party lines, and I will continue to work with them to see real progress in the City of White Plains.”

Lecuona noted that her petitions for Mayor in the Democratic Primary generated more signatures that Mr.  Roach, the incumbent. The Democratic Party has until Friday to challenge the validity of the 2,700 signatures.

Andrew Custodio  of Gedney Way was nominated for a second Common Council seat. He is a professional engineer with Skanska USA where he supervised electrical engineering and construction projects including the Metro-North Croton-Harmon Shop upgrade and the new LaGuardia Airport redevelopment. Prior to this he was Senior Engineer at AMTRAK NEW YORK, where he supervised construction within Penn Station and the North River and East River tunnels. Mr. Custodio is President of the Gedney Park Association, and active in the Council of Neighborhood Associations.

The third Republican-Conservative candidate is Cass V. Cibelli, who has run for Mayor of White Plains previously and spent his career in education in New York City rising to Principal of several schools.

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Issues for Millennials

WPCNR EYE ON THE FUTURE. From NewsandExperts.com July17, 2017:

Millennials: Plan For Retirement Now
Or Pay The Price Later

Millennials are a stressed out generation.

A study by the American Psychological Association reported that the group of Americans in their early 20s to late 30s came in at a 5.4 stress level on a scale of 1-10, higher than the American average of 4.9.

Among the things keeping them up at night are predictions of being the first generation that will be less well off than their parents – and that includes retirements that potentially will be less secure.

No longer do millennials have the pensions to look forward to in retirement like their parents and grandparents before them, and no longer do they have the confidence that Social Security will help at least supplement some of their retirement income.

“Every generation has had its own set of trials and adversaries to conquer,” says David Rosell, financial professional and author of Keep Climbing: A Millennial’s Guide to Financial Planning (www.DavidRosell.com).

“However, today’s generation of young adults faces a uniquely challenging environment. And saving money for retirement is a luxury that many just can’t afford.”

Rosell goes on to say that sometimes millennials have to struggle for a while in order to acquire a sound financial foundation for the future.

He offers some tips to millennials for improving the odds their retirements will be a little more stress free:

• Start saving and investing early. If it’s true that the early bird catches the worm, it’s certainly true that the early investor catches a sound retirement.

If you start investing $2,000 a year for seven years in an IRA (Individual Retirement Account) at the age of 19, you could be a millionaire by age 65. While it might not be practical for most 19 year olds to invest $2,000 a year, Rosell says, the point is that making sacrifices and saving or investing money early makes life much easier down the road.
• Be patient, it’s a long road ahead. Patience isn’t always the word that comes to mind when we think about millennials. However, if you are working your first or second full-time job, and beginning to put money into investment accounts, you need to remember that retirement is a long way down the road.

“The current stock market volatility can be a very emotional time for investors,” Rosell says. “But the worst move one can make in the middle of such turbulence is to bail. Many investors abandon long-term strategies for the presumed safety of cash. But Millennials have time on their side to be patient with their investments.
• Don’t be your own worst enemy. Obtaining guidance from a financial advisor can help millennials live the life they imagined during their working years and once they retire. The economy will go through ups and downs during your lifetime, but having a financial professional to guide you can improve your financial future and keep you from making some common, costly mistakes.

“There is no greater value than peace of mind when it comes to your investments,” Rosell says. “The time for millennials to start thinking long term is now before they get too far along in their career and realize they are going to have to start playing catch-up.”

Posted in Uncategorized

Tax Cap Limitation for 2018 for Towns, Cities, Muncipalities –1.84%–Announced by Comptroller. Inflation Up. Tax Cap Rises Setting Stage for Higher School Property Taxes

WPCNR SCHOOL DAYS. From the Office of the New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. July 17, 2017:

The state’s property tax levy growth for local governments with fiscal years ending Dec. 31 will be capped at 1.84 percent for 2018, according to New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli’s office.

The state’s property tax levy growth for local governments with fiscal years ending Dec. 31 will be capped at 1.84 percent for 2018, according to New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli’s office.

The figure affects the tax cap calculations for all counties, towns, fire districts, 44 cities and 10 villages across the state.

“After two years of tax growth being limited to less than one percent, inflation has crept up resulting in the highest allowable levy growth since 2013,” DiNapoli said. “This increase is offset by rising fixed costs and limited budget options. I continue to urge local officials to exercise caution when crafting their spending plans.”

By comparison, property tax levy growth for school districts was capped at 1.26 percent for the 2017-18 fiscal year.

Posted in Uncategorized

MASTER PLAN FOR WESTCHESTER COUNTY AIRPORT HEARING JULY 27

2013labordayflights 006 

PUBLIC HEARING SCHEDULED ON DRAFT MASTER PLAN

FOR THE WESTCHESTER COUNTY AIRPORT 

A public hearing on the Westchester County Airport’s draft master plan will be held on Thursday, July 27 at 7 p.m. in the Little Theater at the Westchester County Center.

The public hearing will include a presentation of the draft master plan and an opportunity for attendees to comment on the draft plan.

Doors will open at 6 p.m. and there will be free parking at the County Center parking lot.

WHERE:       Westchester County Center

Little Theater

198 Central Ave, White Plains

WHEN:          Thursday, July 27

                        7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

 

Posted in Uncategorized

WHITE PLAINS WEEK THE FRIDAY EVENING PROGRAM OF JULY 14 NOW ON THE INTERNET

THE NEW FRIDAY NIGHT  JULY 14 EDITION TELECAST OF WHITE PLAINS WEEK WAS NOT SHOWN ON LOCAL TELEVISION FRIDAY NIGHT DUE TO A PROGRAMMING ERROR. YOU MAY SEE THE PROGRAM ON YOUTUBE RIGHT NOW AT THESE LINKS

The YouTube link is
 
 
the whiteplainsweek.com link is
 
 

2016318wpw 004

PETER KATZ      JOHN BAILEY        JIM BENEROFE

ON

1-OPENER

THE PETITIONS ROLL IN.

4-ridgewaytoday

RIDGEWAY PROPERTY “LAKE” TURNS TO YELLOW SCUM.

7-SILVER

THE SILVER EFFECT

10-AMELIA

AMELIA EARHART PHOTOGRAPH “PROOF” OF SURVIVAL ISN’T

13-SHOCKER

CANCER TREATMENT BREAKTHROUGH

8-TRUMP THE PRESIDENT

22 NEW YORK AVENUE

AND MORE..

SEE IT 

ON THE INTERNET ALL OVER THE WORLD NOW

RKOTower

The YouTube link is
 
 
the whiteplainsweek.com link is
 
 
2016520 042
Posted in Uncategorized

Latimer: Silver Decision Demands Ethics Reform Now

WPCNR CAMPAIGN 2017. From the Office of State Senator George Latimer. July 14, 2017:

After former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s corruption conviction was overturned yesterday, Senator George Latimer (D-Rye) demanded that Albany take up the ethics reform package that he has been sponsoring in Albany during his tenure in the State Senate.

“Sheldon Silver’s true crime was violating the public’s trust in its elected leaders, and the court’s decision doesn’t change this one bit,” said State Senator George Latimer.
“He used his position of authority to profit himself and for this he deserves punishment to the fullest extent of the law. More importantly, the climate of influence peddling and backroom deals that Silver, Dean Skelos and others, Democrat and Republican,  relied on still needs to be addressed in Albany. So long as Republicans refuse to even hold meetings of the Senate Ethics Committee and block meaningful reforms that I and others have proposed, this will not be the last scandal to rock state government.”
Latimer currently sponsors legislation to crack down on the kind of behavior Silver was originally convicted of, including:
 limiting state legislators’ outside income to 15% of their annual state salary, as is the rule for Members of Congress (S.25 – Sen. Hoylman); and requiring  annual ethics training for all members of the state legislature and the executive branch, and all of their employees (S.919 – Senator Croci).
Posted in Uncategorized