Chase–Reacting to WPCNR Spotting an “official looking bank communication scam”

WPCNR SCAMSTOPPERS. From Abuse@Chase.com. December 28, 2019:

This morning WPCNR received a letter from “Chase” via e-mail about a transaction that was made by my defunct account on December 27 in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

I called up my local White Plains Chase bank where I used to have accounts, the key words are “used to.” The Chase person handling my call identified it as a scam and suggested I forward it to abuse@chase.com . I did that and received this warning in return from Chase:

Thank you for forwarding the suspicious communication you received. 

If you need assistance or replied to a suspicious message, please visit chase.com/contactus.

You should continue to look out for email, calls, or texts that:


 Ask you to provide your credit or debit card number, any personal information, such as your Social Security number or taxpayer identification number, or your chase.com sign in information,
– Threaten to close your account if you don’t send personal information immediately, or
– Tell you that unauthorized charges are on your account and ask you to enter or confirm your account informatio
n.

These communications are designed to look like we sent them, so be careful 

and report any that you receive. Chase will not ask you for personal 

information by communication.

For more information and advice, visit chase.com/security.

If you have an account-specific question or are notifying us of a complaint, please visit the Secure Message Center or call us so we may address your concern.

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