UNNAMED FIGURES: GHOSTS OUT OF TIME AT LINCOLN SQUARE THAT TELL THEIR STORY

Hits: 41

WPCNR ART IN TIME.Exhibition Review by John F. Bailey, March 2, 2024:

 

The name of the exhibition at the American Folk Art Museum in New York is provocative. It stuns you.:

Unnamed Figures: Black Presence and Absence in the Early American North

Evocative. Eternal. Visceral. Disbelief.

With every painting by unknown and known black artists of America’s first two centuries, every sculpture, every photograph and painted landscapes of young growing America the roles of northern slaves are witnessed in heartbreaking, somber testimony in the works  of those black artists  who lived, painted, photographed, sculpted as slaves and freedmen and women in the American North.

As you wonder through the dark halls that evoke a dignified mausoleum dedicated to artists lost, their talents exploited by northern slaveowners in the 1700s and 1800s leading up to and beyond the Civil War.

The ambitious curation of this exhibition is on view through March 24 at 2 Lincoln Square on 66th Street, West of Central Park. It is a visit to the past you will never forget.

I  have not been so jarred by an exhibition since I saw the slave hut on Andrew Jackson’s estate in Nashville, a slave quarters that housed 19 slaves in ramshackle structure the size of a studio apartment.

Unnamed Figures brings back to life the long dead slaves who endured the cruelty of slavery in the “abolitionist” north to tell the truth through their art that has lived on to tell their stories.

This exhibit  opened my eyes about slavery in the northeast. the paintings,sculptures and photographs haunt you at every step, putting a real face on real slaves and freemen and women in the 19th century. it was never taught to me in the history classes of  high school, how widespread slavery was in the north as well as the south.

This exhibition will make you linger, think, feel deeply or ever so slightly the wrongs, the diminution of black talent.

Other than the hard unpaid brutal living and working for nothing, I was shocked by the slave owners’ shameful  exploitation of  slaves who were artists in spare time, artists many of home photographed and painted portraits of their owners  and the owners’ friends and the owners pocketed the fees the artists’ works.

 

In the elegant somber texts explaining paintings, portraits and photographs, you learn how paintings of blacks promoted in the north the inferiority of blacks who are shown looking up to their master owners in portraits.

George Washington and Family with Slave in background by an artist who was a slave.

Many of those paintings for fees that slave owners kept are on display here. as a writer myself i can feel that injustice. All pride in the work is diminished when you are not paid for it and your owner keeps your fee.

The exhibition offers a new window onto black representation in a region that is often overlooked in narratives of early African American history.

 

Through 125 remarkable works including paintings, needlework, and photographs, this exhibition invites visitors to focus on figures who appear in—or are omitted from—early american images and will challenge conventional narratives that have minimized early black histories in the north, revealing the complexities and contradictions of the region’s history between the late 1600s and early 1800s.

Unnamed figures…  

If you are black. this is a must-see exhibition and your pride  will be uplifted.

If you are white, it will open your eyes, touch your heart,  sadden and cleanse your soul.

Unamed Figures is art performing its mission profoundly and effectively, eternally.

I recommend it!

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

WHITE PLAINS WEEK TONIGHT 7:30 EST–THE MARCH 1 REPORT FIOS CH45 COUNTYWIDE, IN WHITE PLAINS CH76 OPTIMUM AND www.wpcommunitymedia.org

Hits: 86

THE HOUSING NUMBERS FOR JANUARY IN WESTCHESTER

CDC SAYS ADULTS OVER 65 NEED A SPRING COVID SHOT. WHY AND WHY NOT

MARTIN GINSBURG’S CITY SQUARE RENOVATION SHOWS THE NEW WAY

TO CREATE OFFICE SPACE–LEASES 9 NEW TENANTS IN CITY SQUARE

JANET LANGSAM, ARTSWESTCHESTER LEADER  FOR 30 YEARS TO RETIRE

WHITE PLAINS POLICE AGREE ON NEW 2 YEAR CONTRACT

FINAL ONEWHITEPLAINS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN HEARING MONDAY AT 7:30 PM

MASTER PLAN FOR THE AGING SUGGESTIONS SOUGHT FROM AGING-UPS MARCH 7

WITH JOHN BAILEY AND THE NEWS

EVERY WEEK ON THE WHITE PLAINS WEEK 

FOR 23 YEARS

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

CDC URGES SPRING COVID VACCINE SHOT FOR OLDER ADULTS. GET VACCINATED. REASONS WHY PEOPLE ARE NOT GETTING VACCINATED. PEOPLE.

Hits: 100

Posted in Uncategorized

FLORIDA GIVES MEASLES ROOM TO SPREAD

Hits: 90

View in browser

Si quiere leer la versión en español, pulse aquí.


The measles outbreak at a Florida elementary school has grown to 8 cases and counting.

We have measles outbreaks all the time (although the rate is increasing due to vaccine hesitancy), but this one came with a new controversy. The Florida State Health Department released a letter with a surprising new recommendation that contradicts standard of practice guidelines for measles outbreaks in two big ways:

  1. Isolation. It stated that unvaccinated kids who were exposed to measles could continue to attend school. This is unprecedented. Those with no prior immunity need to isolate for 21 days.
  2. Vaccination. It failed to recommend kids without immunity get vaccinated. Many parents don’t know that unvaccinated kids can still get protection from a vaccine within 72 hours of exposure. (Also, the standard of care is that if they get vaccinated within 72 hours, they can return to school as long as they don’t develop symptoms.)

Failure to isolate for measles is a major problem

The purpose of requiring unvaccinated children to stay home after measles exposure is to reduce, or rather stop, transmission.

Failure to do so significantly increases the chances of a prolonged outbreak. 

We don’t require isolation for most viruses. If kids don’t get a flu shot, they don’t need to skip school if they were exposed to influenza. But measles is different:

  1. Measles is one of the most contagious viruses known on Earth. The R0—or the number of people an infected person can infect—is much higher than other viruses. Viruses spread exponentially, so in a population that doesn’t have immunity, just a few cases can become many very quickly. This means it takes a huge effort to contain it.

    Data visualization by Kristen Panthagani

  2. Measles is (largely) eliminated (although the U.S. status may change soon). In other words, it’s not spreading at a low level in other parts of the community. We want to keep it that way.
  3. Measles has a long incubation period. It takes 5-21 days from exposure for symptoms to develop. So even if a child, especially an unvaccinated one, doesn’t have symptoms, they may be contagious and spread it to others, including in the community.

The FL letter tries to justify the decision to let exposed kids without immunity go to school by arguing that the vaccination rates in Florida are high. It’s true that 90% of FL kindergartners are vaccinated, which is high. But not high enough—because measles is so contagious, the threshold for herd immunity against measles is 95%. This means there are pockets in the school, other schools, and a community that measles could burn through.

Keeping kids home from school is hard, but sometimes it is very necessary

Missing school is not something health officials recommend lightly.

But recommendations are always grounded in tradeoffs: disease severity, the potential for transmission, disruption to parents, childcare, productivity, economy, days of in-person schooling lost.

We have all experienced quarantine and know what a disruption it is to our lives. It is only recommended when truly necessary.

As a parent, the most disappointing part of this letter is the lack of information on actions parents can take.

For example, if they don’t want their child to miss school, they can get vaccinated, even after exposure. It will help reduce the severity of symptoms if infected, too. However, the window is short. Leaving this information out so parents don’t know is another level of deception.

Many have forgotten measles, but it is no joke

We have the privilege of forgetting measles because vaccines have largely wiped it out. But unfortunately, that privilege means many have forgotten just how bad it is:

  • It is extremely contagious. Among unvaccinated, 9 out of 10 people exposed will get infected.
  • It can make kids very sick. For people without immunity, 1 in 5 will be hospitalized, 1 in 20 will develop pneumonia (the most common way measles kills young kids), 1 in 1000 will develop encephalitis (infection of the brain, sometimes causing permanent brain damage), and 1-3 in 1000 will die.
  • It can cause “immune amnesia,” where the immune system loses its ability to fight other viruses that people were previously immune to.

Data visualization by Kristen Panthagani, data sources herehere, and here

Bottom line

Measles is not a new virus. We have been studying it for more than a century. There are reasons we have standards of practice, and it’s a slippery slope to think otherwise. Measles is no joke, and containing it should not be up for debate.

We hope parents and the community are paying attention. It takes a team approach to stop infectious diseases. This can mean strengthening immunization requirements or asking for bills requiring transparency about which schools have lower vaccination rates so parents can make informed decisions. The scary question is: What happens when community responsibility breaks down? We hope this is not the road we are headed down.

Love, KP and YLE 

Posted in Uncategorized

HOUSING SHORTAGE INCREASES HOME PRICES, SALES IN WESTCHESTER. HOMES FOR SALE DECREASED 30%

Hits: 133

 

Limited Supply Fuels Price Growth in the Greater New York City Metropolitan Area

(NOTE : Link to ALL regional reports:  Market Data (hgar.com).)

 

In Westchester County, January sales of single-family homes and co-ops decreased 12.7% and 19.2% respectively, while condo sales increased 1.4% compared to January of 2023. The median sales price increased 5.4% to $858,250 for single-family homes and 31.5% to $562,000 for condos. The median sales price for co-ops decreased 1.6% to $182,000.

New condo listings increased 15.5% while new co-op listings declined 18.3%. New listings for single-family homes decreased by just 2.2%. Overall inventory of single-family homes for sale declined by almost 30%, while co-op inventory was down by 37% and condos, 16.3%. Pending home sales rose 6.9% in Westchester as compared to a year earlier.

January home sales continued to decline, while prices increased in most markets in the Greater New York City Metropolitan area, according to a report released today by the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors (HGAR), based on data supplied by OneKey® MLS. A limited supply and strong demand are responsible for the current market conditions.

However, as the spring selling season approaches, the region’s home sales sector is bolstered by a noticeable increase in pending sales throughout the region, HGAR officials noted.

With the prospect of lower mortgage rates as the Federal Reserve Board considers multiple rate cuts this year, home sales are expected to increase as more homes come to the market beginning in the spring and summer months.

“With mortgage interest rates moving slightly higher now, we continue to experience the trend of people taking a ‘wait and see’ approach before deciding to list their homes for sale, but would caution against trying to time the real estate market based on such marginal changes,” noted HGAR President Carmen Bauman. “Nevertheless, we do anticipate more movement during the Spring with additional inventory on the market.”

Sales of single-family homes declined in all six of HGAR’s coverage areas, while some counties experienced increases in co-op or condo sales. All six regions saw prices increases in all property types.

“While it will take some time to have the HGAR home sales market fully reset from the impacts of high inflation and mortgage interest rates, home sales are projected to rise significantly in each of the next two years as the market steadily returns to normal sales activity,’” said HGAR Chief Executive Officer Lynda Fernandez.

 

Posted in Uncategorized

GOVERNOR HOCHUL ASKS PRESIDENT BIDEN FOR “EXECUTIVE ACTION” TO EASE NEW YORK’S IMMIGRANT HOUSING CRISIS

Hits: 125

For Immediate Release: 2/23/2024
GOVERNOR KATHY HOCHUL

STATEMENT FROM GOVERNOR KATHY HOCHUL ON WHITE HOUSE VISIT

“Today I traveled to the White House for conversations with President Biden, Chief of Staff Zients, Secretary Mayorkas and other White House officials. I had a chance to express my gratitude for President Biden’s leadership of our economy, securing major investments in transportation infrastructure and clean manufacturing that will create tens of thousands of jobs across New York.

 

“We also had a series of productive meetings, focused on immigration and finding solutions to New York’s migrant crisis. Speaker Johnson and the House Majority’s decision to kill a bipartisan immigration compromise will have devastating consequences for our state. In the absence of legislation, I expressed to President Biden and Chief of Staff Zients that New York would support executive action on immigration.

 

“These meetings made one thing exceedingly clear: President Biden is the leader our nation needs in these difficult times.”

Posted in Uncategorized

COFFEE with WHITE PLAINS WEEK THIS MORNING-THE FEB 23 REPORT AT 8:30 AM EST ON FIOS CH 45 AND WP OPTIMUM CH 76 AND WWW.WPCOMMUNITYMEDIA WORLD WIDE

Hits: 271

TONIGHT BREADLINES IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY  AND THEY ARE GROWING COUNTRY’S RICHEST COUNTY.

 

THE STATE OF THE NEW YORK OFFICE FOR PERSONS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES WAITING LIST AND GOVERNOR HOCHUL’S 5 YEAR PLAN. FOR GRAPPLING WITH THE NEED TO HOUSE DISABLED ADULTS WHOSE PARENTS CAN NO LONGER HANDLE THEM THE ASTRONOMICAL COST OF HOUSING THE DISABLED

WESTCHESTER’S WISH LIST FOR ALBANY

JOHN BAILEY AND THE NEWS

EVERY WEEK ON WHITE PLAINS WEEK

SINCE 20O1 A,D,

 

Posted in Uncategorized

MEDICAL DOCTOR CHARGED WITH HEALTH CARE FRAUD, KICKBACKS TOTALING OVER $20.7 MILLION IN FALSE, FRAUDELENT CLAIMS TO MEDICARE FOR LAB TESTS, INCLUDING CANCER GENETIC TESTS

Hits: 130

WPCNR FBI WIRE. From The Federal Bureau of Investigation. FEBRUARY 23, 2023:

A federal grand jury in New Jersey returned a superseding indictment Wednesday,  charging a medical doctor with allegedly engaging in a health care fraud and illegal kickback scheme that involved the submission of over $20.7 million in false and fraudulent claims to Medicare for laboratory tests, including cancer genetic tests.

According to court documents, Alexander Baldonado, 68, of Queens, New York, allegedly received cash kickbacks from a laboratory representative and others in exchange for approving orders for laboratory tests billed to Medicare. As part of the scheme,

Baldonado also allegedly participated in COVID-19 testing events at which he authorized COVID-19 tests as well as expensive and medically unnecessary cancer genetic tests that patients did not request, that were not used in the patient’s treatment, and for which the patients rarely received the results. Baldonado also allegedly billed Medicare for lengthy office visits that he never provided to these patients.

In addition, Baldonado allegedly engaged in a scheme to defraud Medicare and Medicaid by soliciting and receiving cash kickbacks and bribes from an owner of a durable medical equipment supply company in exchange for ordering orthotic braces that were medically unnecessary and ineligible for reimbursement.

Baldonado is charged with one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud, six counts of health care fraud, two counts of conspiracy to defraud the United States and pay and receive health care kickbacks, and one count of soliciting health care kickbacks.

If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison for each count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud, health care fraud, and soliciting health care kickbacks, and a maximum penalty of five years in prison on each count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and pay and receive health care kickbacks. A federal district judge will determine any sentence after considering the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Acting Assistant Attorney General Nicole M. Argentieri of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, Special Agent in Charge Naomi Gruchacz of the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG), and Assistant Director in Charge James Smith of the FBI New York Field Office made the announcement.

HHS-OIG and FBI are investigating the case.

Assistant Chief Rebecca Yuan and Trial Attorney Hyungjoo Han of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section are prosecuting the case.

The Fraud Section leads the Criminal Division’s efforts to combat health care fraud through the Health Care Fraud Strike Force Program.

Since March 2007, this program, currently comprised of nine strike forces operating in 27 federal districts, has charged more than 5,400 defendants who collectively have billed federal health care programs and private insurers more than $27 billion. In addition, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, working in conjunction with HHS-OIG, are taking steps to hold providers accountable for their involvement in health care fraud schemes.  More information can be found at www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/health-care-fraud-unit.

An indictment is merely an allegation. All defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

Updated February 22, 2024
Posted in Uncategorized

RESPIRATORY ACTIVITY SEEN STRETCHING TO MAY. MEASLES, RAW MILK. COVID HIGH ACROSS THE USA

Hits: 116

Si quiere leer la versión en español, pulse aquí.


State of Affairs: Feb 22

Respiratory activity Stretching to May? and… measles? And… raw milk?

Slowly but surely we’re moving through the 2023-2024 respiratory season. I’m also adding a measles section to the State of Affairs because… well… here we are in the 21st century.

Let’s dig in.

Influenza-like illnesses: Moderately stubborn

The rate at which people are going to the doctor with a fever, cough, or sore throat is stubborn—stalling at a very inconvenient rate. But a two- or three-hump season is very normal (i.e., in pre-pandemic times). This could stretch out to April or May.

Outpatient Respiratory Illness Visits (Source: CDC; Annotated by YLE)

Increased activity is driven by our kiddos. Outpatient visits among 0-24 year olds continue to increase, while visits among other age groups are receding.

Percent of Outpatient Visits for Respiratory Illness by Age Group (Source: CDC; Annotated by YLE)

Covid-19: High

Covid-19 wastewater levels are high nationally. And, in fact, higher than they were this time last year. Although national rates are declining, the South has a very weird pattern. We don’t know why.

Wastewater Viral Activity Levels (Source: CDC; Annotated by YLE)

Covid-19 hospitalization admissions are stalling after a nice decline. We remain at fewer hospitalizations than last year.

(Source: CDC; Annotated by YLE)

CDC and WHO are paying attention to another highly mutated variant in South Africa. However, there have only been 9 cases, with no impact on wastewater or hospitalization trends. This seems like a dud, which is great news. No other huge variants are on the horizon; JN continues to be king.

Flu: Still high and stabilizing

The rate of hospitalizations due to flu remained stable compared to last week. Flu can stretch out, sometimes to even May, so this is unsurprising. It’s not too late to get your flu shot!

Weekly rate of laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations among cases of all ages, 2014-15 to 2023-24, MMWR Week 6(Source: CDC; Annotated by YLE)

RSV: Plummeting

RSV continues to go down nationally. It’s clear we’ve hit our season’s peak.

Percent positive RSV tests in the United States, by week (Source: CDC)

More good news with RSV: many babies (40%) got monoclonal antibodies this winter. This could certainly be improved, but given the rough access issues, it is a decent start.

Measles: More outbreaks

This may be a bad year for measles (see why in my previous post), so many epidemiologists are carefully watching the data.

So far, in 2024, we’ve had 20 cases across 11 states. This is about twice as many cases as this time last year.

Data is delayed, so this doesn’t include a few recent cases making the news:

  • Ohio reported its second case of the year, which exposed a number of people at a grocery store.
  • Washington also reported a case, which is likely from international travel.
  • An elementary school outbreak in Florida has infected six so far. Florida allows non-medical vaccine exemptions, which has increased since 2021. And Florida is below the herd immunity threshold, with ~90% vaccination rate (we need 95%). The worst part is the Florida Surgeon General’s letter to parents ignoring standards of practice and suggesting schools and parents should “choose their own adventure” with measles containment. It is egregious. Expect a full YLE post on this soon, but here is my initial reaction. I wasn’t happy.

Other things I’m paying attention to:

  • E. coli outbreak linked to raw milk cheese.
    • At least 10 cases across 4 states, with 4 people hospitalized and one developing a serious kidney condition.
    • There is a reason we pasteurize dairy, people. This method was developed 160 years ago to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and foodborne illnesses. Please don’t fall for wellness misinformation. Raw milk has zero additional health benefits.
  • Next week, ACIP—CDC’s external scientific advisory board—is meeting to discuss all vaccines. I will report back on Covid-19 and RSV. I have two big questions:
    • What is the spring plan for Covid-19 vaccines? U.K. (and local U.S. jurisdictions like Los Angeles) have announced that older people can get a spring Covid-19 vaccine. I assume this is coming for the U.S.
    • What does the safety profile look like for the older adult RSV vaccine? Some questions were brought up during clinical trials. We really need real-world data.

Bottom line

This respiratory season continues to march on with few surprises. Unfortunately, it’s happening amidst a backdrop of misinformation, which will increasingly cause a mess, like measles and e-coli outbreaks.

Vaccines. Masks. Ventilation. Tests. Treatment. Isolation. We can do things to keep ourselves healthy. For high-risk folks, this may also mean changing Spring Break plans to avoid a measles outbreak or two.

Love, YLE


“Your Local Epidemiologist (YLE)” is written by Dr. Katelyn Jetelina, M.P.H. Ph.D.—an epidemiologist, wife. During the day, she is a senior scientific consultant to several organizations, including CDC. At night, she writes this newsletter. Her main goal is to “translate” the ever-evolving public health world so that people will be well-equipped to make evidence-based decisions. This newsletter is free, thanks to the generous support of fellow YLE community members. To support this effort, subscribe below:

Posted in Uncategorized

BREADLINES IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY NY USA: HOW THE OTHER HALF EATS.

Hits: 138

WPCNR OBSERVATIONS & COMMENT. By John F. Bailey. February 22, 2024:

I could not figure out what persons were lined up for at this location Wednesday morning.

Over 100 persons were lined up on the sidewalk  on this boulevard waiting for something.

When I left my appointment, I saw this scene was still there.

A truck from Feeding Westchester was unloading pallets of foodstuffs, one after the other, and persons were coming in to pick up bags of needed food.

With horror I realized this was a breadline.

At this time, 9:45 in the morning,  I counted 75 people: men, women, children in that line.

The temperature was 35 hard edge cold degrees.

UP CLOSE AND VERY PERSONAL HOW OFTEN DO THE POOR AND HUNGRY HAVE TO DO THIS? THEY ARE THE REFUGEES OF WESTCHESTER, CITIZENS NOT IMMIGRANTS BUT RESIDENTS OF THE COUNTY FOR THE MOST PART. 

You didn’t want to be out there for a short walk let alone 2 hours.

The only thing missing was trashcans with fires lit to warm hands.

If you are comfortable and have food and a home, you are not afflicted by the cold. If you have a job you probably are not afflicted by the cold

This breadline, and I imagine there are others like them at Feeding Westchester pickups all over the county are a disgrace.

They are a Westchester tragedy.

The county and county businesses have to look hard and do better.

I have never seen this before in my adult living in this county.

The non-profits of Westchester, most notably, Feeding Westchester are doing their best, but this scene should not be.

Those 100 people or who knows how many could get frostbite in this weather.

Hunger, breadlines in the open, lack of childcare, it is all being compounded in exponential misery in persons who are laid off, sick, and hungry all the time, and no matter they are not eating right, and they are tired all the time. Discipline slowly disappears daily, as hunger does not go away and despair intensifies, just deteriorating their lives.

If this is prevalent all over the county, the county must pay more attention to it. These people can’t pay for the high cost of food.

This was commented on just yesterday in an article in The New York Times business section about how food companies like Walmart, Pepsi, Coca Cola, Shake Shack are seeing less business in their snack products and burger businesses. The article says that overall inflation peaked at 9.1% and now is  3.1% the first of January.

The companies the article asked about pricing only included one grocery, Walmart. The others were softdrink and snack companies. Does this mean the poor subsist on soft drinks, sugar shakes and burgers? Those companies the article said are planning to raise prices this year 2.5% for Shake Shack,  and Walmart a $100 Billion dollar company increased sales 4.3%.

This tells me that the people on the county breadlines cannot afford supermarket prices.

Does this mean that Coke, Pepsi and the restaurant chains make up the diet of the poor?

What is missing from this report on food inflation, which in itself is quite revealing about the insatiable and downright cruel greed of big food, (raising food prices to make up their costs even though it is hurting people to do so), is surveys of supermarket chains, supply chains.

The other obvious but very often overlooked inflation analyses by inflation commentators is the compounding effect of price increases. Admittedly, I am no economist, but every price increase is cumulative.  Economists in rose-colored glasses and financial commentators, report gleefully inflation is down to 3% a year.

Please, the consumer is no fool.

We know the food is costing more and is not going down.

Nine percent inflation last year, now down to 3% a month. That means the cumulative inflation is 12% in 13 months. Three  percent increases a month just keep making things worse at the supermarket. Thee percent increases a month is 36% compounded in a year. All you need to know about economy measure is who is making money and who is not

This “Huzzah”  that the food companies are not going to raise prices as much by the business press as being a wonderful thing food companies are doing is simply business cheerleading.

The people on that breadline are not making money enough to go to the supermarket. Instead the softdrinks, the snacks,the shakes, the Big Macs are making the poor unhealthy.

Meantime, the root cause of hunger is not having jobs. Not having hiring months. Refusing to hire minorities, or letting immigrants take jobs while awaiting asylum judgments.

I also think that food distributions have to make distribution points inside.

Westchester winter has been a cruel cold in the 20s and mid-30s during the day. In summer the poor, the hungry, the sweating masses will be faced with sweltering, dehydrating heat.

Distribution points should be located at places to shelter the 100 or so coming for the Feeding Westchester distributions: The County Center, Urgent Care centers (which can check the waiters for symptoms and overall health), Gymnasiums in schools, warehouses.

Breadlines.

They remind me of just how close you and I can be to being just like those poor souls, if we have an accident, get fired, or companies keep making money at our expense and make it impossible to eat.

There are several women who come to my neighborhood on recycling days to collect discarded deposit return cans, that is how poor they are.

Breadlines..

In 2024.

This is America in the 1930s, not the 2020s.

The press should be asking those who would be leaders, how can we deal with poverty, hunger, killer drugs, medicare looting hospitals, usurus  banks, and robber barons

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized